• 1 day The Federal Reserve and Money...Aspects which are not widely known
  • 8 minutes How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy
  • 12 minutes  What Russia has reached over three months diplomatic and military pressure on West ?
  • 2 hours GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 2 days Coincidence of EIA Report Delay? - "I had seen it delayed minutes, and a couple of times a few hours, but don’t recall something like this — do others?" asks Javier Blas
  • 5 hours European Parliament Members, Cristian Terhes et al, push back against Totalitarian Digital ID and Carbon Tyranny in Europe.
  • 3 days Demonising fossil fuels has caused major grid problem in Australia
  • 7 days "And this is perhaps the most dangerous kind of government there can be."
  • 2 days "...too many politicians believe things that aren’t true." says Robert Rapier
  • 3 days Oil Stocks, Market Direction, Bitcoin, Minerals, Gold, Silver - Technical Trading <--- Chris Vermeulen & Gareth Soloway weigh in
  • 3 days Welcome to Technocracy - The New World Energy Order... "1000s Of Sydney Homes Plunged Into Darkness As Aussie 'Price Cap' Policy Sparks Energy Shortage"
  • 4 days "How to Calculate Your Individual ESG Score to ensure that your Digital ID 'benefits' and money are accessible"
  • 329 days Beware the Left's 'Degrowth' Movement (i.e. why Covid-19 is Good)
  • 7 days ESG Topic - "German Police Raid Deutsche Bank, DWS Over Allegations Of Greenwashing" - ZeroHedge Bloomberg and others
Vanand Meliksetian

Vanand Meliksetian

Vanand Meliksetian has extended experience working in the energy sector. His involvement with the fossil fuel industry as well as renewables makes him an allrounder…

More Info

Premium Content

Why Battery Metals Are Bafflingly Cheap 

Oil is sometimes referred to as ‘black gold' while cotton is often called ‘white gold'. Now, with the global fight against climate change taking off, a similar interest is growing for specific natural resources that are crucial for eco-friendly technologies such as EVs. Lithium and cobalt, which are essential for the production of batteries, have seen a particularly spectacular rise in demand. Counterintuitively, however, the production costs of these metals dropped by almost 30 percent in 2019. This could be a watershed moment for the widespread adaptation of EVs which are increasingly becoming price competitive with internal combustion vehicles.

Rising demand

Environmentalists have, for decades, been warning of the effects of climate change, which has had little impact on the adaptation of specific technologies. In recent years, however, sales of hybrid and fully electric vehicles have taken off significantly due to the rapid improvement of technologies, increased government subsidies, and lower production costs. In some instances, countries are struggling to install sufficient recharging installations such as Norway which has the highest per capita concentration of EVs in the world.

China, on the other hand, is the biggest market for auto producers. In 2018, more hybrids and EVs were sold in the Asian country than the rest of the world combined. Chinese companies have a firm grip on the global supply chain of crucial battery components. To strengthen its global position, Beijing has made it a top priority to have a dominant role in the technologies of the future. EVs are among the ten key areas identified under the ‘Made in China 2025’ industrial strategy, which has given yet another boost to demand. Related: Will China Cutoff Rare Earth Exports?

Mining activities, however, are having a devastating environmental and social impact in some areas where lithium and cobalt can be found. The extraction of cobalt is particularly problematic, with most of it concentrated in a single region in the south of DR Congo where over half of the world's supply is produced. Due to political instability and weak institutions, illegal mines are common in the area where 35,000 children participate in activities. Unfortunately, the electrification of societies and rising demand for batteries do not bode well for the future of mining in DR Congo.

Rising demand but dropping prices

Counterintuitively, soaring sales of EVs in China, Europe, and the U.S. haven’t had the expected effect on commodity prices. According to some analysts, the market is in oversupply because producers have reacted to predictions of insufficient lithium and cobalt production. It is expected that the current situation will continue into 2020 and maybe even further.

Francesco Venturini, CEO at Enel X, predicts a watershed moment for EVs as overall production costs are also decreasing. He compared the recent developments with the experience of the PV industry in 2010 when prices had come down 84 percent due to a steep decline of the commodity polysilicon, used in photovoltaic cells, from $450/kg to $70/kg in a single year.

Uncertainty ahead

From an economic point of view, the dropping prices of certain commodities are a godsend for EV producers. In 2015, the battery made up around 57 percent of the total costs of vehicles. Lower prices mean that the share of batteries in the overall expenses has dropped to 33 percent this year, and by 2025 it could have reached 20 percent. This prediction does not include a sustained reduction in lithium and cobalt prices, which could lower costs even further and improve the competitiveness of EVs vis-à-vis the internal combustion engine.  Related: How Clean Is “Freedom Gas”?

However, it is more likely that market forces will keep supply and demand in balance and prices in check. Lower prices will lead to increased demand for EVs, which will affect commodity prices. Furthermore, producers are looking for alternative methods and metals to produce batteries with in order to prevent overdependence on lithium and cobalt. This would influence demand in the long term and therefore, suppress prices. For the time being, the world is dependent on a limited number of metals to power the shift away from fossil fuels, and the dropping prices could not have come at a better time.

By Vanand Meliksetian for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment
  • Bill Simpson on June 02 2019 said:
    They might find some combination of elements to replace cobalt, but I doubt it.
    Replacing lithium is probably impossible due to its electron shell structure. That would be like trying to replace carbon in millions of different molecules. It can't be done. Other types of batteries may never match the energy storage potential of lithium batteries. Thousands of scientists are working on battery technology.

Leave a comment




EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News