Insider Secrets

Insider Secrets

Learn how the PROs are making money from the oil and energy market.

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Energy

  • Why Canada’s Oil Industry May Never Be the Same

    Never is a long time. The dictionary definition is, “at no time in the past or future; on no occasion; not ever.” In the volatile oil and gas industry, those who try to look that far into the future and predict anything with certainty are invariably wrong. Here’s hoping. But it’s not all bad, oil prices are gradually rising because of market physics and investor sentiment. Federal and provincial politicians are softening their opposition to, and have even publicly declared support for, pipelines to tidewater. The worst is over. However, it is increasingly certain that the future will not be…

  • Russia And Saudi Arabia Locked In Relentless Fight Over China's Oil Market

    Russia and Saudi Arabia have been (relatively) quietly fighting for market share in China ever since oil prices started their downward spiral in mid-2014—now the battle is heating up, and teapot refineries are what could tip the balance. Though the Saudis had historically been China’s biggest oil supplier, Russia managed to take the top spot several times during that period, thanks to the so-called teapot refineries. This has now forced the Saudis to do something they’ve never done before—target teapots on the spot market in order to regain lost market share. Related: Why Saudi Arabia Will Not Win The Oil Price…

  • Venezuela’s Electricity Blackout Could Cut Off Oil Production

    On Tuesday, Venezuela shortened its workweek to just two days as the country suffers through a deepening power crisis. Venezuela sources about 60 percent of its electricity from hydroelectric dams, but a stubbornly persistent drought has caused water levels to drop dangerously low, curtailing electricity generation. The Venezuelan government, in an effort to deal with a shrinking power supply, first declared in early April that Fridays would not be working days. But the four-day workweek has quickly been shortened to just two days as power shortages have become acute. For the next two weeks, government offices will only be operational…

  • How The Debacle At Doha Marked The End Of An Era

    Sunday, April 17th was the designated moment. The world’s leading oil producers were expected to bring fresh discipline to the chaotic petroleum market and spark a return to high prices. Meeting in Doha, the glittering capital of petroleum-rich Qatar, the oil ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), along with such key non-OPEC producers as Russia and Mexico, were scheduled to ratify a draft agreement obliging them to freeze their oil output at current levels. In anticipation of such a deal, oil prices had begun to creep inexorably upward, from $30 per barrel in mid-January to $43…

  • Oil Prices Jump To Six-Month High

    Oil prices surged to their highest levels in six months on Wednesday as the Fed left interest rates unchanged. WTI jumped by 2.8 percent to $45.29 per barrel and Brent climbed by 3.17 percent to $47.19 per barrel. Those are the highest prices so far in 2016 and the oil markets continue to bet on rising momentum for crude. The Federal Reserve added strength to oil when it announced its decision to leave interest rates unchanged, a move that caused the dollar to weaken and oil prices to rise. The Fed also softened its language regarding its concerns over the…

  • Saudi Oil Exports To U.S. Reach 11-Month High

    One hundred and six years after Claude Grahame-White performed the first night flight, and today’s oil market is flying blind once more, supported by macro factors while immediate fundamentals remain a blind spot. Hark, here are seven things to consider in the oil market today: 1) The Japanese yen is doing its best to support oil prices today, as the yen has rallied like a mad thing on inaction by the Bank of Japan. Many were expecting the announcement of further stimulus measures to counteract recent strength in the yen, but the central bank decided against increasing asset purchases. Its…

  • Massive Oil Theft By Pirates Costs Nigeria $1.5 Billion Every Month

    Depressed oil prices, rampant corruption, and pipeline vandalism are only parts of Nigeria’s oil problem. It’s now losing a massive 400,000 barrels of crude daily to pirates in the Gulf of Guinea, an amount equal to the entire daily export capacity of its Forcados terminal. Overall damage from piracy, theft and fraud for Africa’s largest oil exporter is estimated at some $1.5 billion a month, according to U.S. deputy ambassador to the UN, Michele Sison, citing a Chatham House report. Attempts by local governments and the UN to put a stop to piracy have met with some success, but the…

  • Big Oil Surprises Analysts, Is The Worst Behind Us?

    Once again its earnings season and the first quarter is likely to be one of the most closely watched in a long time since it encompasses a period of time in which oil prices were at their lowest. WTI and Brent dropped below $30 per barrel in January and February, hitting their lowest levels in more than a decade. The oil industry had posted a sea of red ink in prior quarters, but the first three months of 2016 had the ingredients to be much more painful. So far, the results have been a mixed bag, with several companies doing…

  • $500 Billion In Lost Oil Revenues Forces Gulf Nations To Turn To Debt Markets

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has projected a whopping $500 billion loss in revenue for the Gulf nations in 2016, which is 30 percent more than the $390 billion lost in 2015. The massive shortfall has crippled the gulf economies, which are facing record budget deficits and seeking external funding to overcome it. Many experts believe that $100 per barrel oil prices are history, and we might not revisit those prices for more than a decade. It implies that the recent crisis will not end as quickly as the downturn in 2007-2009. The oil-dependent nations will have to figure out…

  • Why Saudi Arabia Will Not Win The Oil Price War

    Crude oil prices continued to surprise on Tuesday, with the U.S. benchmark adding another 4 percent to $44.60 a barrel. West Texas Intermediate is now up 65 percent since hitting 13-year lows below $27 a barrel February 11. It's a performance only bettered by the globe's second most traded bulk commodity – iron ore. But like analysts of the steelmaking raw material, many in the industry have been surprised by the extent of the rally, consistently calling the oil price lower. The blame for the cloudy outlook for crude is mostly being laid at the door of Saudi-Arabia.After the collapse…

Martin tiller