• 5 minutes Covid-19 logarithmic growth
  • 8 minutes Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 12 minutes Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 14 minutes China Takes Axe To Alternative Energy Funding, Slashing Subsidies For Solar And Wind
  • 2 hours Which producers will shut in first?
  • 5 hours The Most Annoying Person You Have Encountered During Lockdown
  • 2 hours Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 21 hours We are witnesses to the end of the petroleum age
  • 1 hour Russia's Rosneft Oil Company announces termination of its activity in Venezuela
  • 4 hours Saudi Aramco struggling to raise money for this year's dividend of $75 billion. Now trying to sell their pipelines for $10 billion.
  • 1 day Breaking News - Strategic Strikes on Chinese Troll Farms
  • 9 mins How to Create a Pandemic
  • 1 day >>The falling of the Persian Gulf oil empires is near <<
  • 4 hours Saudi Arabia Can't Endure $30 Oil For Long
  • 1 day A New Solar-Panel Plant Could Have Capacity to Meet Half of Global Demand
  • 11 hours Wastewater Infrastructure Needs

Betting on Mediterranean Shale: 3 Plays, 1 Winner

The Mediterranean has joined the shale game, but as most of Europe’s Mediterranean countries drag their feet, all eyes are on Israel, Turkey, and Algeria.

For Israel, it will be a slow road without the majors.

For Algeria, it’s full speed ahead, in theory—but the foreign interest is just dabbling for now due to a lack of shale infrastructure.  

For Turkey, the situation is more promising thanks to a renewed interest by the majors and a near-perfect blend of good governance and attractive fiscals.

Here’s what the playing field looks like:

Turkey

Turkey is the best bet here. In Turkey, it’s all about the Dadas Shale, in which the majors have recently expressed a renewed interest, making the game immediately more promising for the North American juniors who are betting heavily on this play.

The Dadas Shale is being compared to Texas’ Eagle Ford shale and Oklahoma’s Woodford shale in both size and potential. What is that potential? Well, those who are investing in it say it has more than 100 billion barrels of original oil in place.

While nothing’s being produced, testing is about to begin and new technology has the majors and juniors highly optimistic. 

Positives

•    Everyone likes working with the Turkish government—permits are fast and bureaucracy is kept to a minimum. Turkey is too keen to become a regional energy…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News