• 4 minutes Trump has changed into a World Leader
  • 7 minutes China's Economy and Subsequent Energy Demand To Decelerate Sharply Through 2024
  • 8 minutes Indonesia Stands Up to China. Will Japan Help?
  • 10 minutes US Shale: Technology
  • 13 minutes Which emissions are worse?: Cows vs. Keystone Pipeline
  • 17 minutes Shale Oil Fiasco
  • 20 mins Boris Johnson taken decision about 5G Huawei ban by delay (fait accompli method)
  • 15 hours We're freezing! Isn't it great? The carbon tax must be working!
  • 1 min Phase One trade deal, for China it is all about technology war
  • 8 hours Angela Merkel take notice. Russia cut off Belarus oil supply because they would not do as Russia demanded
  • 2 hours Might be Time for NG Producers to Find New Career
  • 12 hours Environmentalists demand oil and gas companies *IN THE USA AND CANADA* reduce emissions to address climate change
  • 15 hours Prototype Haliade X 12MW turbine starts operating in Rotterdam
  • 10 hours Swedes Think Climate Policy Worst Waste of Taxpayers' Money in 2019
  • 14 hours Wind Turbine Blades Not Recyclable
  • 13 hours Denmark gets 47% of its electricity from wind in 2019
  • 1 day Beijing Must Face Reality That Taiwan is Independent

Where To Look For Value This Earnings Season

Eagle Ford

It’s that time again! A few weeks after the end of each calendar quarter-year, we enter what is known as earnings season, when quarterly results for corporations come thick and fast. As much as we like to kid ourselves that there is some hidden driver of stock prices that only we know, the reality is that they are simply a reflection of the past and expected future profitability of companies, which is what makes this time so important. Big energy companies usually release their results late in the season, which makes now a good time to look ahead at what to expect over the next couple of weeks.

Although the likes of Exxon (XOM) and Chevron (CVX) have yet to report, there was one energy sector earnings release this morning, and it is one that often gives clues as to what to expect. Schlumberger (SLB) reported earnings and revenue that were just about dead in line with expectations, so told us nothing really. The interesting information, however, came in their outlook. While the Houston-based oilfield services company said that U.S. shale oil had returned to a growth area there was weakness elsewhere, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico.

The immediate and obvious conclusion is that that is bad news with regard to the oil earnings to come, but that is not the case. The move away from deep water drilling and towards fracking shale rock in the U.S. has been well documented for some time. It should therefore come as no surprise to anyone that the recovery in operations…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News