• 3 minutes Cyberattack Forces Shutdown Of Largest Gasoline Pipeline In United States - Zero Hedge
  • 7 minutes The Painful Death of Coal
  • 11 minutes Forecasts for Natural Gas
  • 3 hours 1 in 5 electric vehicle owners in California switched back to gas because charging their cars is a hassle, new research shows
  • 2 hours U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes
  • 1 day .
  • 14 hours GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 1 day Сryptocurrency predictions
  • 1 day *****5 STAR Article by Irina Slav - "The Ugly Truth About Renewable Power"
  • 2 mins Electric vehicle market growth is a blessing for some metals — and not a big worry for oil
  • 2 hours CRAPPIFORNIA DOES IT AGAIN! California proposes to steer new homes from gas appliances
  • 8 hours Is the Republican Party going to perpetuate lies about the 2020 election and attempt to whitewash what happened on January 6th?
  • 7 hours Joe Biden's Presidency
  • 20 hours How US Capitalism Uses Nationalism
  • 4 days European gas market to 2040 according to Platts Analitics
IEA: Governments Should Start Stockpiling Battery Metals

IEA: Governments Should Start Stockpiling Battery Metals

China's dominance in green energy…

Soaring Petrochemical Demand Sparks Major Profits

Soaring Petrochemical Demand Sparks Major Profits

Petrochemical companies are going from…

Oil Markets Optimistic As Brent Flirts With $70

Oil Markets Optimistic As Brent Flirts With $70

There was a slight pullback…

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

More Info

Premium Content

The U.S. Army Doubles Down On Battery Technology

The U.S. Army is expanding research efforts to solve the current challenges to battery technologies and drive advancements in battery science and energy storage that will become increasingly critical with the use of sophisticated electronics.   The U.S. Army has recently awarded a US$7.2 million contract to a battery consortium led by the University of Maryland as part of its latest research campaign on extreme battery technology.  

The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory will work on the University of Maryland-led effort in partnership with Montana State University and other universities, national laboratories, and companies that are part of the Center for Research in Extreme Batteries. The cooperative agreement also includes research entities and companies in the battery and energy storage sector, such as Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, the National Institute of Standards & Technology, Graphenix Development Inc, Ion Storage Systems, the New York Battery & Energy Storage Consortium, Saft America, Stony Brook University and the University of Texas-Austin.

The research of the battery technology effort will focus on extreme charging, extreme safety, extreme voltages, extreme evaluations, and extreme transformational innovations to promote the development of new materials and novel battery designs such as solid-state lithium batteries. 

“Part of the work is to try to evaluate commercial batteries or new battery systems in a way that is more reflective of how the Army uses batteries,” said Dr. Jeffrey Read, an Army chemist and one of the team leaders for the laboratory’s Battery Science Branch. 

Batteries and storage solutions will become critical when the U.S. Army adds a wide range of new electronics gear and capabilities over the next five to ten years, Read added. 

Related: Why Libya’s Surge In Oil Exports Won’t Last

The Department of Defense is also challenging innovators and private firms as the DOD seeks solutions for resilient energy production, transmission, use, and storage. The DOD wants to use all energy sources for military use such as wind, solar, thermal, hydro, nuclear, and hydrogen while reducing dependence on fossil fuels. The DOD—one of the largest single consumers of energy globally—aspires to eliminate all fossil fuel dependency. Mobile and fixed energy storage is one of the topics in the DOD challenge that seeks solutions ranging from such that can be put to work immediately, those that need some development, and also moonshot ideas that may not be implemented until 2045. 

Research into battery chemistry and cost-efficient and effective energy storage will also be critical to the advancement of civil and consumer technologies that will be needed to support the growing share of renewable energy generation in the power mix and the electrification of transport. 

The U.S. Army collaboration effort with researchers and universities could potentially result in breakthroughs in the current limitations of battery chemistry and use for civil purposes. 

For years, scientists and researchers are looking to improve lithium-ion battery technology or develop new battery chemistry or materials that would enhance battery performance and contribute to the wider adoption of renewable energy, energy storage, and electric vehicles. 

For example, earlier this year, researchers from the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) and the Samsung R&D Institute Japan (SRJ) created a prototype of a new type of solid-state battery with high energy density, half the size of a typical lithium-ion battery, that could enable an electric vehicle (EV) to travel up to 500 miles (800 kilometers) on a single charge. 

Others have been trying to make lithium-oxygen batteries a viable energy storage solution by overcoming some of the challenges to the commercial use of this type of batteries. 

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers said in May they had developed a thin-film, highly conductive solid-state electrolyte made of a polymer and ceramic-based composite for lithium metal batteries.

All these efforts go to show that battery science and energy storage are becoming critical parts of novel energy solutions that could accelerate the energy transition away from petroleum dependence, both in the U.S. Army and in civil applications for EVs and energy storage. 

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News