• 3 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 19 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 51 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 52 mins EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 3 hours US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 17 mins The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 11 hours Petrol versus EV
  • 5 hours OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 6 mins Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 3 hours The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 8 hours 10 Incredible Facts about U.S. LNG
  • 48 mins Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 16 hours E-mopeds
  • 3 hours A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 6 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 1 day These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
Alt Text

The Next Pillar Of Oil Demand Growth

Pundits continue to discuss peak…

Alt Text

Why Crypto Miners Are Paying Attention To The Permian

The Permian is literally burning…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Shale Production Heads Into Overdrive

Oil

Friday February 16, 2018

In the latest edition of the Numbers Report, we’ll take a look at some of the most interesting figures put out this week in the energy sector. Each week we’ll dig into some data and provide a bit of explanation on what drives the numbers.

Let’s take a look.

1. Exxon battered

(Click to enlarge)

- ExxonMobil's (NYSE: XOM) share price traded at about $75.50 as of February 15, down more than 15 percent since February 1.

- That kind of drop is very rare for one of the world’s largest integrated oil companies. As Bloomberg Gadfly notes, the period of Feb. 1-9 saw the worst decline in Exxon’s stock since October 2008 during the depths of the financial crisis. Gadfly points out that the company lost some $56 billion in value.

- The oil major’s woes are multifaceted. Exxon posted poor fourth quarter figures two weeks ago – lower production levels and weak cash flow.

- Bloomberg Gadfly also points out that Exxon used to trade at a strong premium relative to its peers, but that is no longer the case.

- The longer-term story is that Exxon has seen its return on capital employed fall, undercutting the case for its high share price. Moreover, some of its competitors offer more advantages in terms of cash flow or production growth.

- In other words, the luster for holding Exxon shares has worn off.

2. Shale surge overstated or understated?

(Click…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News