• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 15 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 2 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 2 mins Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 2 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 17 hours Tesla Faces 3 Lawsuits Over “Funding Secured” Tweet
  • 4 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 17 mins Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 21 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 10 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 13 hours California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 1 hour WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 1 day WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 13 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
Alt Text

Oil Prices Fall Despite Supply Fears

Oil prices started the day…

Alt Text

Diesel Trucks Aren’t Going Anywhere

In trucking, diesel will be…

Alt Text

Oil Claws Back Some Of This Week’s Losses

OPEC production has spiked, with…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Oil And Gas Inventories Continue To Draw

Cushing

Friday January 26, 2018

In the latest edition of the Numbers Report, we’ll take a look at some of the most interesting figures put out this week in the energy sector. Each week we’ll dig into some data and provide a bit of explanation on what drives the numbers.

Let’s take a look.

1. Shell catching up with Exxon

(Click to enlarge)

- Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE: RDS.A) is expected to post $16 billion in earnings for 2017 when it reports financials next week, a figure that could eclipse ExxonMobil’s (NYSE: XOM) earnings of $15.7 billion. If so, it would be the first time Shell took in more profits than its American rival in more than two decades.
- Shell’s rise is largely the result of its purchase of BG Group, a $53 billion acquisition that is now paying off. The purchase gave Shell large LNG assets in Australia and offshore oil assets in Brazil.
- Shell’s shares have returned more than five times that of Exxon’s, notes Bloomberg, making it a better vehicle for investors than Exxon.
- Shell is closing the gap on Exxon in terms of market share. In early 2015, before the BG deal, Exxon’s market cap exceeded Shell’s by $180 billion. Shell has since close the gap to just $73 billion.
- Exxon’s production has eroded a bit while Shell’s is rising, suggesting the two will continue to converge. “At the moment we are number two and we are closing in on number…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News