• 5 minutes Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 10 minutes Iranian Sanctions - What Are The Facts?
  • 15 minutes U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 2 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 2 mins Sears files Chapter 11
  • 18 hours U.S. - Saudi Arabia: President Trump Says Saudi Arabia's King Wouldn't Survive "Two Weeks" Without U.S. Backing
  • 22 mins Natural disasters and US deficit
  • 2 hours China Is the Climate-Change Battleground
  • 17 hours How High Can Oil Prices Rise? (Part 2 of my previous thread)
  • 2 days COLORADO FOCUS: Stocks to Watch Prior to Midterms
  • 1 day How Long Until We Have Working Nuclear Fusion Reactor?
  • 2 days $70 More Likely Than $100 - YeeeeeeHaaaaa
  • 10 hours Threat: Iran warns U.S, Israel to expect a 'devastating' revenge
  • 15 hours German Voters Set to Punish Merkel’s Conservative Bloc
  • 16 hours Saudi A Threatens to Block UN Climate Report
  • 2 days China Tariff Threatens U.S. LNG Boom
Alt Text

The Next Pillar Of Oil Demand Growth

Pundits continue to discuss peak…

Alt Text

US Demands For More Oil Could Backfire

The State Department’s request for…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Is Saudi Arabia Showing Signs Of Weakness?

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia is increasingly portrayed as a wayward actor intent on destabilizing everything it can get its hands on, uncomfortable about raising oil production despite U.S. warnings that the Saudi king would not last for two weeks without America’s military support. Riyadh, however, is aspiring to perform a triple balancing act, appeasing U.S. President Trump and adhering firmly to its vision of creating a grand OPEC+ crude oil producers’ alliance with Russia, whilst simultaneously keeping crude prices at a level which is sustainable for its economy. In this, Saudi Arabia will face a plethora of challenges, seen in this week’s sudden Saudi Arabia-Kuwait talks on restarting oil production in the Neutral Zone.

In Mohammad bin Salman’s failure to get a deal done lie many uncomfortable truths about Riyadh’s rather limited options. As details begin to transpite, it turns out the September 30 meeting between Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah has sowed more confusion than settled discrepancies between the two nations. Interestingly, the visit was initially intended to be a two-day one, but in the end was reduced to a couple of hours, with no official communication following the leaders’ reportedly tense talks. According to sources from both Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, one of the key points of contention was the resumption of oil production in the Partitioned Neutral Zone which was…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News