• 8 minutes U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 13 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 2 hours Knoema: Crude Oil Price Forecast: 2018, 2019 and Long Term to 2030
  • 2 hours Nuclear Pact/Cold War: Moscow Wants U.S. To Explain Planned Exit From Arms Treaty
  • 2 hours Why I Think Natural Gas is the Logical Future of Energy
  • 3 hours Merkel Aims To Ward Off Diesel Car Ban In Germany
  • 1 hour A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 18 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 12 hours Get on Those Bicycles to Save the World
  • 1 day The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 19 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 day Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 9 hours Long-Awaited Slowdown in China Exports Still Isn’t Happening
  • 21 hours Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 12 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
Alt Text

Canadian Oil Patch Grapples With Cannabis Legalization

Canada has officially legalized recreational…

Alt Text

Carbon Pricing Won't Kill Big Oil

Big oil has agreed to…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Global Energy Advisory May 18th 2018

Asian economies are facing higher inflationary pressure as their crude oil import bill expands in line with benchmark prices. Although some analysts have argued that even oil at $100 a barrel won’t affect global demand in any negative way, a tab of $1 trillion for total Asian crude imports with Brent at $80 might do just that.

Soaring demand in China and India will be responsible for the higher expenses but both countries are likely to double down on their efforts to cut their dependence on imports, or at least imports priced in dollars as a stronger greenback is adding to their oil bill.

Imports from Iran, to be paid for in other currencies, could be a way out of the trap. Indeed, some analysts believe that the return of U.S. sanctions against Tehran will actually be a boon for China as it seeks to expand the international clout of its currency, as Iran seeks to reduce already low reliance on the global oil currency.

India has not yet made public any plans to change the terms of its import deals with Iran but it did report record-high Iranian crude imports for April, at 640,000 barrels daily. Besides, India already pays for Iranian crude in euro and unless European countries decide to comply with the sanctions, its imports from Iran will not be affected.

Deals, Mergers & Acquisitions

• ConocoPhillips is considering the divestment of its North Sea operations—a deal that could fetch $2 billion for the company, if all assets…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News