• 5 minutes Covid-19 logarithmic growth
  • 8 minutes Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 12 minutes Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 14 minutes China Takes Axe To Alternative Energy Funding, Slashing Subsidies For Solar And Wind
  • 5 hours Which producers will shut in first?
  • 8 hours The Most Annoying Person You Have Encountered During Lockdown
  • 1 hour Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 1 day We are witnesses to the end of the petroleum age
  • 4 hours Russia's Rosneft Oil Company announces termination of its activity in Venezuela
  • 14 mins How to Create a Pandemic
  • 7 hours Saudi Aramco struggling to raise money for this year's dividend of $75 billion. Now trying to sell their pipelines for $10 billion.
  • 6 hours Saudi Arabia Can't Endure $30 Oil For Long
  • 14 hours Wastewater Infrastructure Needs
  • 2 hours KSA taking Missiles from ?
  • 1 day A New Solar-Panel Plant Could Have Capacity to Meet Half of Global Demand
  • 1 day >>The falling of the Persian Gulf oil empires is near <<
Alt Text

Shale Giant Files For Bankruptcy As Oil Price War Rages On

U.S. shale giant Whiting Petroleum…

Alt Text

How Far Will Trump Go To Save U.S. Shale?

Washington is increasingly worried that…

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

More Info

Premium Content

Traders Scramble To Find Oil Buyers Amid Falling Chinese Demand

Commodity trading houses and oil majors are scrambling to find spot buyers for crude oil outside China, where demand is depressed because of the coronavirus outbreak and where some buyers are asking to delay buying, Asia-based traders told Bloomberg on Tuesday.

Cargoes of grades ranging from Russia’s ESPO to Brazil’s Lula to Iraq’s Basra Light are being offered for delivery in a few weeks time, an unusual pattern because they would have already been traded weeks ago, according to the traders who spoke to Bloomberg.

Buyers in Asia are not too enthusiastic to snap up spot cargoes, because refining margins are weak. One potential beneficiary of the depressed crude trading market in China could be India, where refiners see opportunities in buying prompt cargoes.

China’s oil demand amid the coronavirus outbreak is likely inflicting the worst oil demand shock to markets since the financial crisis of 2008-2009, with Chinese demand plunging by 20 percent compared to the typical demand for the season, sources with inside knowledge of the Chinese industry told Bloomberg earlier this month.

China’s refiners are awash with an oversupply of refined petroleum products—gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel—as the Lunar New Year holiday was extended, economic activity has slowed down, and people are either discouraged or outright banned from traveling long distances by airplanes, cars, buses, or trains.

Sinopec, the largest oil refiner in Asia, is cutting its refinery production by 600,000 bpd in February, due to decreased fuel demand amid the raging coronavirus outbreak, four sources familiar with the plans told Reuters on Monday.

China’s independent refiners were expected to cut refinery throughput more significantly because they are not allowed to export fuels, unlike the state-held corporations. Independent refiners in China’s Shandong province in the east have already cut refinery runs by as much as 30-50 percent and are now said to operate at less than half of their refining capacity, according to Reuters’ sources.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage






Leave a comment
  • Mamdouh Salameh on February 04 2020 said:
    The problem with some contributors to the oilprice.com is a tendency to treat speculation as a truth without concrete evidence.

    For instance, an analyst claimed yesterday that China’s oil demand COULD decline by 20% amid the coronavirus outbreak. Today we see that speculation has morphed in this article into a full blown truth that “Chinese demand PLUNGED by 20% compared to the typical demand for the season”.

    With China virtually in quarantine and therefore closed to business and unable to receive crude oil shipments, speculators are having a field day offering unsubstantiated speculations which find their way into contributors of articles to the oilprice.com who, in turn, readily treat them as facts without authentication. That is partly what is pushing oil prices down.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News