Insider Secrets

Insider Secrets

Learn how the PROs are making money from the oil and energy market.

Loading, please wait

Alternative Energy

  • Are “Palm Trees” The Next Step In Solar Energy’s Evolution?

    Solar energy quickly gaining attention as the most attractive form of new electricity generation as there have been some substantial investments in the solar energy sector of late. In fact, more than 50 percent of the total investments in new electricity generation around the world was made in renewable energy. A report made by PWC and the University of Cambridge for the national bank of Abu Dhabi stated that the world invested around $150 billion into solar energy in 2014. “As Government and utilities are driven to bring new generation capacity on stream, this new reality (Solar energy) presents a…

  • Sun Edison’s Stock Has Been Slammed. Is the Sell Off Justified?

    As the specter of volatility returns to the stock market, investors in all segments of the market are starting to feel some of the pain that has hit energy investors so hard over the last year. This is small comfort to energy investors though, as stocks in that beleaguered sector have been hit even harder. The walloping in some companies is truly breathtaking and has to be putting some investors on edge. A classic case of this is Sun Edison, trading under ticker symbol SUNE. Sun Edison is a good company that has built an enormous solar business, but much…

  • Sweden’s Nuclear Shutdown A Sign Of What’s To Come

    Most people thinking about energy policy in Europe tend to focus on the renewable power the continent generates. While it is certainly true that many European countries have made enormous strides in renewable energy generation, there is another fuel source that is unusually important in many European countries compared to the rest of the world; nuclear power. Sweden is a prime example of this. The country generates almost 35 percent of its electricity from nuclear power – just shy of the amount that it generates from all renewable sources combined. It was big news and more than a little surprising…

  • Nuclear Utility Suffers Setback As DC Pursues Clean Energy

    Regulators for Washington DC rejected the proposed purchase of Pepco Holdings by Exelon, potentially killing off the $6.84 billion acquisition. By law, the DC Public Service Commission (PSC) said, the deal must benefit the public, and not just leave it unharmed. Chairman Betty Ann Kane said on August 25 that the body’s move was “one of the most important decisions the commission will ever make.” The rejection was momentous, as Exelon had already received approval from neighboring states in the region, including Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, along with the regulatory approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The…

  • Wind Energy Could Blow U.S. Coal Industry Away

    It’s not enough to say that fossil fuels have to go or nuclear is hopeless (which are both probably true statements). The question is: What will replace them? Furthermore, how long will it take? An intriguing headline appeared in CleanTechnica on August 4: Wind Could Replace Coal As US’ Primary Generation Source, New NREL Data Suggests. Wouldn’t that be nice? Is it even possible? (The article originally appeared in The Handleman Post on July 26.)Though solar energy has become the poster child for renewable energy generally, the strongest player in the game, for now, is wind. Wind leads solar energy…

  • The Coming Clean Energy Space Race

    One of the seminal achievements of the last century was the Space Race and its successful culmination in putting a man on the moon. What must have seemed like a wildly audacious plan when it was first announced, ushered in a new era of satellites and space shuttles, and positioned America at the forefront of a technological revolution. Now a new program, backed by a number of notable British scientists and business luminaries, is seeking to capture the same spirit of perseverance and use it to address another huge challenge – climate change. The Global Apollo Programme is setting out…

  • Germany Struggles With Too Much Renewable Energy

    Since the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, Germany has been one of the few countries that have successfully moved away from nuclear energy. Germany has so far successfully shut down its nine units that had the capacity of generating enough power for at least 20 million homes in Europe. In fact, the contribution of nuclear power in Germany’s electricity generation has now fallen to just 16 percent and renewables are now the preferred source of electricity generation in the country. Image Source: GreenTechMedia However, Germany and its neighbors are now facing an unusual problem. With the dramatic increase in green energy…

  • PV Solar Could Have Some Serious Competition

      Abengoa’s IST Thermal Trough About half the energy burned in the U.S. is used to make hot water and heat (most of which is below the boiling point), yet PV solar and wind energy do little to provide it aside from electric water tanks and inefficient baseboard heaters. Does that mean natural gas is here to stay? Solar thermal, as the term is generally used, is a bit of a misnomer, since the thermal output is used to make electricity. It becomes part of the same process as a conventional steam or gas turbine plant, but instead of burning…

  • The Most Innovative Companies In Renewable Energy

    As the oil price bust continues, renewable energy and sustainability innovation is continuing unabated. For instance, an architecture company recently unveiled a set of plans for a smart floating farm project that helps preserve land space and improve food production efficiency. The plans are just hypothetical at this point and it is unclear if they will ever be built, but that’s not really the point. The project shows that, around the world, companies and individuals continue to devote time and resources to innovation in sustainable living.In a similar vein for instance, in the solar field, small companies are creating a…

  • Could This Be The Next Great Renewable Energy Source?

    Worldwide oil prices are subject to quite a bit of volatility and are often affected by political disputes and controversies. When we consider these facts, in conjunction with the amount of pollution generated by burning petroleum products for fuel, it's no surprise that scientists and governments are trying to explore alternative forms of energy. One of the newest, and seemingly most viable forms of clean energy, could be poised to outperform all of the existing options, including solar: algae biofuel. Algae are found throughout the Earth's oceans, where they employ photosynthetic processes to create energy using sunlight. Some types of…

Martin tiller