• 2 minutes California to ban gasoline for lawn mowers, chain saws, leaf blowers, off road equipment, etc.
  • 6 minutes China and India are both needing more coal and prices are now extremely high. They need maximum fossil fuel.
  • 11 minutes Europeans and Americans are beginning to see the results of depending on renewables.
  • 2 hours GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 1 day The Climate Scare Stories Began With Far Left Ideology Per GreenPeace Co-Founder
  • 11 hours Monday 9/13 - "High Natural Gas Prices Today Will Send U.S. Production Soaring Next Year" by Irina Slav
  • 1 day Putin and Xi have decided not to attend the Climate Summit in Glasgow
  • 2 days Biden Sets Target Of 50% EV Share In U.S. Car Sales In 2030
  • 19 hours US intel warns China could dominate advanced technologies By NOMAAN MERCHANT October 22, 2021
  • 2 days "The Hidden Story About California's Container Ship Backlog" via Corbett Report
  • 5 hours NordStream2
  • 1 day Storage of gas cylinders

Oil At $100 Unsustainable: Iraqi Minister

A crude oil price of $100 per barrel would be unsustainable, said the Iraqi Oil Minister, Ihsan Abdul Jabbar Ismail, as quoted by Reuters.

In an interview with Skynews Arabia, Abdul jabber Ismail also said that Iraq planned to raise its oil production capacity to 8 million barrels daily, saying this would be a balanced production capacity.

The senior Iraqi official’s opinion regarding oil prices is similar to that of Bank of America analysts who last week warned that Brent crude may well hit $100 this winter.

With gas prices soaring, an uptick in demand for diesel could result in a global economic crisis as governments are already stretched fiscally and monetarily, the BofA analysts said.

The factors that could lead to this perfect storm include a cold winter, keeping gas demand high and increasing demand for oil as some utilities switch from gas to oil, which would still be cheaper, and an increase in jet fuel demand.

“If all these factors come together, oil prices could spike and lead to a second round of inflationary pressures around the world,” the analysts wrote in the note. “Put differently, we may just be one storm away from the next macro hurricane.”

Such a crisis would lead to economic contractions and, eventually, lower oil prices, proving such a price level is unsustainable in the current state of the global economy.

However, according to the BofA analysts, it will be a while before prices begin to decline, even in the event of a global economic contraction. According to them, “A multiyear run up in crude oil prices is now in the cards.”

OPEC agrees with the bullish outlook, seeing demand or oil rising through 2035 despite Paris Agreement commitments.

“There are still considerable doubts as to whether all these ambitious climate-mitigation commitments will be met in the proposed timeframe,” the OPEC secretariat said last month.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment
  • Mamdouh Salameh on October 04 2021 said:
    The Iraqi oil minister is wrong. $100 oil is sustainable in a global economy growing at 6.3% this year or more than double its growth rate in 2019 before the pandemic. If a certain oil price is too high, the global economy normally makes its opposition felt in no uncertain terms.

    However, a fair price for Brent crude is, in my opinion, $100-$110 a barrel. Such a price is viable and also good for the global economy because it stimulates the growth of the three ingredients that make up the economy: (1) global investments; (2) the global oil industry; and (3) the economies of the oil-producing countries.

    Furthermore, because of its dependence on the oil revenue to the tune of 95% and also because of its unstable financial situation, Iraq needs a Brent crude price much higher than $100 to balance its budget.

    And while Iraq is indeed capable of raising its crude oil production capacity to 8 million barrels a day (mbd) within five years, it is very essential for it to also increase its export outlets by extending its domestic strategic oil pipeline to the Jordanian port of Aqaba on the Red Sea, repairing the damaged part of the Iraqi-Turkish pipeline (ITP) and also rehabilitating the Kirkuk-Banias oil pipeline across Syria or replacing it with a new one once stability is fully restored to Syria.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London

Leave a comment

EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News