• 4 minutes Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe
  • 7 minutes Cuba Charges U.S. Moving Special Forces, Preparing Venezuelan Intervention
  • 12 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 15 minutes Solar and Wind Will Not "Save" the Climate
  • 1 hour Most Wanted Man In Latin America For AP Agency: Maduro Reveals Secret Meetings With US Envoy
  • 2 hours And for the final post in this series of 3: we’ll have a look at the Decline Rates in the Permian
  • 11 hours Amazon’s Exit Could Scare Off Tech Companies From New York
  • 18 hours Prospective Cause of Little Ice Age
  • 22 hours Former United Nations Scientist says the UN is lying about Global Warming and Sea-Level changes
  • 13 hours And the War on LNG is Now On
  • 11 hours L.A. Mayor Ditches Gas Plant Plans
  • 2 hours *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 2 days Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 2 days Qatar Petroleum, Exxon To Proceed With $10 bln Texas LNG Project
  • 1 day Solar Array Required to Match Global Oil Consumption
  • 1 day Europe Adds Saudi Arabia to Dirty-Money Blacklist

Global Energy Advisory December 9, 2016

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• The Petroleum Facilities Guard (PFG) of Libya is fighting the Libyan National Army (LNA) to regain control over the country’s export terminals, which LNA took over in September. The PFG, which is affiliated with the UN-backed Government of National Accord, had suspended shipments of crude from the ports for two years, using the facilities as a bargaining chip in its financial disputes with government agencies. The LNA, on the other hand, which reports to the rival government, the House of Representatives, handed control of the ports to the National Oil Corporation and exports were restarted. The move is widely seen as a quest for power by the LNA’s leader, Khalifa Haftar. The latest from the Oil Crescent is that NOC had evacuated some personnel from the El Sider port because of the LNA-PFG clashes in the area. General Haftar is largely responsible for the relaunch of Libyan oil exports, while the PFG had been holding them hostage. Alliances here are tricky with respect to the PFG, which is largely militia for hire. While Haftar definitely had the upper hand in this equation, the PFG has managed to regroup to some extent—enough so to try to take on the LNA forces once again. We believe Haftar retains the upper hand, but nonetheless it’s getting bloody once again and Libyan oil revenues may suffer.

• Russia and Turkey are working on mending their relations after the freeze following the Turkish…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin



Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News