• 5 minutes Covid-19 logarithmic growth
  • 8 minutes Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 12 minutes Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 14 minutes China Takes Axe To Alternative Energy Funding, Slashing Subsidies For Solar And Wind
  • 16 mins Which producers will shut in first?
  • 11 hours The Most Annoying Person You Have Encountered During Lockdown
  • 18 mins Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 7 hours Russia's Rosneft Oil Company announces termination of its activity in Venezuela
  • 1 day We are witnesses to the end of the petroleum age
  • 13 mins Why should ANY oil company executive get ANY bonus now?
  • 3 hours How to Create a Pandemic
  • 9 hours Saudi Aramco struggling to raise money for this year's dividend of $75 billion. Now trying to sell their pipelines for $10 billion.
  • 2 hours Dr. Fauci is over rated.
  • 5 hours KSA taking Missiles from ?
  • 9 hours Saudi Arabia Can't Endure $30 Oil For Long
  • 16 hours Wastewater Infrastructure Needs

Global Energy Advisory December 2nd, 2016

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

The biggest news of the week, of course, is that OPEC reached an agreement to cut its output by over a million barrels per day, to a target level of 32.5 million bpd in a bid to support the rebalancing of international oil markets. The cut will take effect at the start of 2017 and will be in place for six months, under supervision from a monitoring committee comprised of OPEC oil ministers. Russia will join the effort, having pledged to reduce its output gradually over the six months by some 300,000 bpd. This will effectively mean delaying plans for production expansion rather than an actual cut.

The OPEC deal can be regarded as an indication of the shift in the balance of power in the Middle East because Saudi Arabia, the group’s unofficial leader and largest producer, was forced to make the biggest concession, at the same time yielding to Iran’s insistence to continue pumping at current rates, which are close to 4 million bpd. Saudi Arabia tried the peaceful way and then it resorted to threats, saying it could further increase production but Iran – and Iraq, for that matter – held their ground.

Despite the good news, which immediately boosted international crude benchmarks, skepticism remains rife, with some observers noting that a production cut does not equal an export cut, so OPEC, which has been amassing crude, could continue to export at current rates with a view to maintaining market share,…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News