• 3 minutes Natural gas is crushing wind and solar power
  • 6 minutes OPEC and Russia could discuss emergency cuts
  • 8 minutes Is Pete Buttigieg emerging as the most likely challenger to Trump?
  • 11 minutes Question: Why are oil futures so low through 2020?
  • 13 minutes Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 3 hours So the west is winning, is it? Only if you’re a delusional Trump toady, Mr Pompeo, by Simon Tisdall
  • 7 hours Peak Shale Will Send Oil Prices Sky High
  • 9 hours "Criticism of migration will become a criminal offense.  And media outlets that give room to criticism of migration, can be shut down." - EU Official to the Media.
  • 22 mins Fight with American ignorance, Part 1: US is a Republic, it is not a Democracy
  • 8 hours Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 1 hour CDC covid19 coverup?
  • 4 hours Oil and gas producers fire back at Democratic presidential candidates.
  • 1 day “The era of cheap & abundant energy is long gone. Money supply & debt have grown faster than real economy. Debt saturation is now a real risk, requiring a global scale reset.”"We are now in new era of expensive unconventional energy
  • 16 hours Democrats Plan "B" Bloomberg Implodes. Plan "C" = John Kerry ?
  • 1 day Who decides the Oil costs?
  • 1 day Blowout videos

Global Energy Advisory 4th March 2016

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• Several situations have combined to see a reduction in Iraqi oil sales and exports for February, though exports are still at record highs. Exports from Turkey’s port of Ceyhan remain blocked—as of 16 February. These exports include those controlled by the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) in the Kurdish region of Iraq as well as crude from Kirkuk in northern Iraq, coming from the central government’s North Oil Company (NOC). A section of this pipeline has been rendered inoperable and has cost the KRG—for one--$200 million so far. An explosion on this pipeline two weeks ago was reported without any details, and there still are none. Turkey seemed to be blaming the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) in a knee-jerk reaction, but the Kurds kept quiet—not pointing any fingers. No one has claimed responsibility, and this is off profile for both the PKK and the Islamic State (IS). There are now suspicions emerging that the Turks shut down the pipeline themselves in order to launch military operations against the PKK near the section of the pipeline that’s been offline. The Kurdish silence on the issue would suggest this might be the case as well. How the Kurds would agree to such a move remains unclear because it certainly cannot afford the losses right now. And if they didn’t agree, then it remains unclear what the consequences of this will end up being. Genel Energy—one of the main producers…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News