• 4 minutes What will the future hold for nations dependent on high oil prices.
  • 7 minutes Paris Is Burning Over Climate Change Taxes -- Is America Next?
  • 12 minutes OPEC Cuts Deep to Save Cartel
  • 15 minutes Venezuela continues to sink in misery
  • 1 min End of EV Subsidies?
  • 50 mins Maersk's COO statment.
  • 5 hours Citi cuts Apple's price target
  • 6 hours Asian stocks down
  • 1 hour Japan Effectively Bans China’s Huawei, ZTE From Government Contracts, Joining U.S
  • 3 hours USGS Announces Largest Continuous Oil Assessment in Texas and New Mexico
  • 10 hours China Builds LNG Icebreaker
  • 3 hours GOODBYE FOREIGN OIL DEPENDENCE!!
  • 2 hours Oil prices may go up, but will be below $70 a barrel in FY19: Hindustan Petroleum Chairman
  • 11 hours Price Decline in Chinese Solar Panels
  • 12 hours EPA To Roll Back Carbon Rule On New Coal Plants
  • 3 hours Regular Gas dropped to $2.21 per gallon today

Who Loses in an Oil Bear Market

The bear market for oil has arrived. Brent crude has dropped by more than 20 percent since hitting a multiyear high in June. Now hovering around $90 per barrel, oil traders are no longer confident that oil prices have reached the bottom.

Low oil prices are great for consumers. They act as a tax cut – more money in people’s pockets can have a material effect on purchasing power, and can provide a modest boost to consumer economies.

But a sudden drop in oil prices is not good for everyone. And the latest turmoil within the oil cartel OPEC suggests that the nerves of member countries are beginning to fray. According to The Wall Street Journal, cohesion within OPEC is beginning to erode as certain countries have begun to compete against one another.

Typically, OPEC acts in concert when oil prices slide too quickly, acting collectively to cut back production in order to prop up prices. However, amid the most recent price decline, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have unilaterally cut prices in order to maintain market share, a decision that caught some market analysts by surprise. The price cut was intended to underprice oil from the United Arab Emirates, a fellow cartel member.

Similarly, Saudi Arabia has dismissed calls from Iran to cut back production. Iran is particularly vulnerable to low oil prices. Iran’s oil exports dropped from 2.5 million barrels per day (bpd) in 2011 to 1.1 million bpd in 2013 – a 56% decline – due to…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
-->