• 6 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes Saudis Pull Hyperloop Funding As Branson Temporarily Cuts Ties With The Kingdom
  • 2 hours WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 3 hours Saudi-Kuwaiti Talks on Shared Oil Stall Over Chevron
  • 7 hours OPEC's No. 2 Producer Wants to Know How Buyers Use Its Oil
  • 1 hour Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 9 hours Iranian Sanctions - What Are The Facts?
  • 10 hours U.S. - Saudi Arabia: President Trump Says Saudi Arabia's King Wouldn't Survive "Two Weeks" Without U.S. Backing
  • 4 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 3 hours UN Report Suggests USD $240 Per Gallon Gasoline Tax to Fight Global Warming
  • 10 mins COLORADO FOCUS: Stocks to Watch Prior to Midterms
  • 2 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 7 hours China Thirsty for Canadian Crude
  • 10 hours Superhumans
  • 6 hours Who's Ready For The Next Contest?
Alt Text

Mexican Pipeline Delays To Impact U.S. Gas Flows

The La Laguna-Aguascalientes (LL-AGC) pipeline…

Alt Text

China Blinks First In LNG Face-Off With U.S.

China’s latest tariff strategy involving…

Alt Text

Russia To Resume Gas Imports From Turkmenistan

According to Aleksei Miller, Gazprom’s…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Algeria - Another Setback for the Galsi Pipeline

Situation: The much-heralded Galsi gas pipeline that would expand Europe’s reach to Algeria (and North Africa’s) gas reserves has undergone another setback—this time it may not recover.

Bottom Line: Competing gas pipelines to Europe are a bigger problem—and cause more uncertainty—than available gas reserves. In this game, everyone is hedging their bets, and the Galsi pipeline is the latest victim to be sidelined.

Analysis: The Galsi Pipeline was proposed nine years ago as a way to bring Algerian gas to Northern Italy. The pipeline’s proposed capacity would have been 8 billion cubic meters and would link the two Mediterranean coasts via Sardinia. Galsi would be a win-win for both Europe and Algeria, which would be given another export option, especially once it massive shale deposits are extracted. For Europe, it would be another alternative to Russia’s Gazprom and would have connected existing pipelines running through Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria, and traversing Spain.

The setbacks, however, have been many and the latest may render the project dead. Late last year, Algeria’s state-owned Sonatrach, which was supposed announce a final decision on the pipeline in November, delayed it until May 2013. Sonatrach insists this does not mean the project will not go ahead, but Italy thinks the Algerian company is using Galsi to force other concessions from Italy. 

What is Sonatrach really doing? It wants…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News