• 4 minute Hey Oil Bulls - How Long Till Increasing Oil Prices and Strengthening Dollar Start Killing Demand in Developing Countries?
  • 8 minutes Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 15 minutes Oil and Trade War
  • 2 hours Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 19 hours Are EVs Safer Than Combustion Engine Vehicles?
  • 2 hours U.S. Withdraws From U.N. Human Rights Council
  • 1 hour EU Confirms Trade Retaliation Measures vs. U.S. To Take Effect on June 22
  • 15 hours What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 2 hours North Korea, China Discuss 'True Peace', Denuclearization
  • 3 hours Gazprom Exports to EU Hit Record
  • 21 hours Sell out now or hold on?
  • 8 hours Hey Oil Bulls - How Long Till Increasing Oil Prices and Strengthening Dollar Start Killing Demand in Developing Countries?
  • 8 hours EVs Could Help Coal Demand
  • 5 hours WE Solutions plans to print cars
  • 22 hours Nopec Sherman act legislation
  • 21 hours Migrants: Italy Wants EU Border Agency In Africa, Not At Sea
  • 10 hours Lloyd's of London excludes coal
  • 16 hours Oil and Trade War
  • 17 hours Australia mulls LNG import
Alt Text

Shell Gears Up For Peak Gasoline

Oil major Shell has ramped…

Alt Text

LNG Becomes A Buyer’s Market

A continuous growing supply of…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

How to Profit From a Rise in Natural Gas Prices

Residents of on East Coast of the U.S. are surely eager for spring to arrive after what has been a brutal winter. It seems like every week we are digging out from a new batch of snow. While the Polar Vortex has the mercury dropping, things are heating up elsewhere: in the natural gas market.

Cold weather led to a spike in demand for heating, which means higher consumption levels of natural gas. The surge in demand was reflected in price levels, with the Henry Hub spot price briefly surpassing $8 per million Btu (MMBtu). Local markets fared even worse – spot prices for day-ahead wholesale in the Alogonquin Citygate hub (Boston) blew past $22/MMBtu. Prices in New York were similarly painful. These areas suffered because of inadequate pipeline capacity – bottlenecks that gouge the consumers in the Northeast.


Figure 1 Source: EIA

By all accounts, this is a temporary phenomenon. Spot prices for Henry Hub dropped down to around $4.80-$4.90/MMBtu in the last week of February as temperatures eased, more than $1 cheaper than the prior week. So, we will return to business-as-usual.

But, what will natural gas prices look like for the rest of the year? While we may not see Henry Hub go back above $6/MMBtu anytime soon, the winter of 2014 may have marked the end of cheap gas as we knew it. The “shale gas revolution,” we were told time and time again, ushered in an era of cheap and abundant gas that would last for years. While that may…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News