• 6 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Why hydrogen economics is does not work
  • 4 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 3 mins The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 39 mins Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 3 hours Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 4 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 20 hours Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 13 hours Chinese EV Startup Nio Files for $1.8 billion IPO
  • 24 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 1 day Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 1 day WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 24 hours Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 1 day California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 1 day Monsanto hit by $289 Million for cancerous weedkiller
Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Starbucks, Plastic Fantastic: This Energy Innovator is Increasingly Attractive

From plans to turn coffee grounds and uneaten pastries into bioplastics to energy efficiency competitions among its stores, Starbucks understands that the future is sustainability and that companies demonstrating cost-cutting energy efficiency and innovation will have the investment advantage.

After a rough spell that began with a change in CEO, the company is now scrabbling back up the rungs and it’s all about energy—from energy drinks to energy efficiency, and the unveiling of its single-brewer coffee maker doesn’t hurt, either.

Starbucks’ latest newsworthy innovation is still experimental, but promising. Starbucks Hong Kong has engaged a biochemical engineer to come up with a way to turn all those used coffee grounds and unconsumed pastries into chemicals that would be used to make bioplastics. So far, this has been a success. The research is being supported by the Climate Group, of which Starbucks Hong Kong is a corporate partner.

Specifically, engineers are blending pastries and other baked goods destined for the trash with fungi that secrete enzymes, which in turn break down the carbohydrates in the pastries to simple sugars which are then fermented and exposed to bacteria. The end result is a succinic acid that can be used in bioplastics production, as well as in the production of other substances, such as medicines and laundry detergents.

Starbucks biorefining efforts not only produce useful and efficient chemicals,…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News