• 4 minutes England Running Out of Water?
  • 7 minutes Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 10 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 14 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 10 hours The Political Debacle: Brexit delayed
  • 14 hours Trump sells out his base to please Wallstreet and Oil industry
  • 12 hours No Mercy: EU Fines Google $1.7 billion For Abusing Online Ads Market
  • 13 hours 3 Pipes: EPIC 900K, CACTUS II 670K, GREY OAKS 800K
  • 21 hours Tidal Power Closer to Commercialisation
  • 11 hours New Rebate For EVs in Canada
  • 22 hours Will Trump Cave Again
  • 23 hours Read: OPEC THREATENED TO KILL US SHALE
  • 22 hours Solar to Become World's Largest Power Source by 2050
  • 5 hours Trump Tariffs On China Working
  • 12 hours Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
  • 3 hours Boeing Faces Safety Questions After Second 737 Crash In Five Months
  • 1 day Oil stocks are heating up again! What's on your Watchlist?

Sell Tesla (TSLA) to Buy it Later

As I search through financial markets looking for opportunities to write about, I am frequently reminded that trading and investing are two very different things that demand two very different approaches. Trading is short term and involves spotting when something has momentum, or has gone too far in one direction. What that thing is and whether it has any value over time is basically irrelevant. Investing, on the other hand, involves a judgment about the long term viability and prospects of what you are buying.

They are, as I said, different disciplines, but once you understand that difference it is quite possible to combine the two. Sometimes both a trading and fundamental investing approach suggests the same thing, making for what I consider to be the ideal trade. Sometimes, however, they are in conflict and the obvious trade is in direct contradiction to your long term view. For those with an investing background who have learned some trading techniques along the way, that is a recipe for inaction; they cannot imagine buying something that they don’t see as a good investment, nor would they sell stock in a company that they liked. Those of us who started out trading, however, have no such compunctions.

Take Tesla (TSLA) for example. From a fundamental, long term basis it is hard not to love the stock. Their cars are amazing and the level of technical innovation behind them is staggering. As many boutique luxury car brands have found in the past, however,…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News