• 5 minutes Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 11 minutes Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 17 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 1 day The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 6 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 15 hours Pakistan: "Heart" Of Terrorism and Global Threat
  • 1 hour Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 2 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 2 days Newspaper Editorials Across U.S. Rebuke Trump For Attacks On Press
  • 11 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 20 hours Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 14 hours Are Trump's steel tariffs working? Seems they are!
  • 2 days Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 2 days France Will Close All Coal Fired Power Stations By 2021
  • 2 days Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 1 day Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
Alt Text

Why Trump Won’t Kill Progress On Fuel Economy

The fuel economy standards battle…

Alt Text

Goldman: Trade War Won't Crash Oil Prices

In spite of the impact…

Alt Text

The Oil Bulls Are Back

Oil markets had a bullish…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Resolving Jordan’s Energy Dilemma

Energy is Jordan’s eternal bogeyman; Syria is its immediate threat to stability. Together, they make for a great deal of royal discomfort.

The list of Jordan’s energy woes is a long one. Topping the list is the fact that it has no natural resources to speak of other than oil shale, not to be confused with shale oil (we detail this in a separate report this week). Jordan imports 97% of its energy needs. Dependent on gas pipelines from Egypt to power over 80% of its electricity, ongoing instability in Egypt and the sabotage of pipelines in the Sinai Peninsula has rendered the situation rather desperate. The country is reeling from more than $23 billion in external debt, while at the same time facing the challenge of cutting $2 billion in fiscal deficit this year. It’s an ominous task when it comes simultaneously with cuts in gas supplies from Egypt. This cut in gas supplies means that Jordan is importing heavy fuel to generate power, and the additional price tag for this is up to $1.4 million a day.

Jordan’s responses to its energy crisis are multifaceted:

Raising electricity prices

As of January, Jordan will raise electricity prices by 15%, except for low-use homes. What Jordan most fears is the civil unrest this could spark—as it has in the past. This is where the specter of Syria looms largest. On its own, a rise in electricity prices will not spark enough unrest to translate into instability. But combined with tensions…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News