• 6 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 6 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 8 mins U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 2 days US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 23 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 3 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 36 mins Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 1 day The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 7 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 2 days Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 2 days OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 2 days 47 Oil & Gas Projects Expected to Start in SE Asia between 2018 & 2025
  • 2 days A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 2 days U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
Alt Text

Oil Markets Take A Bearish Turn

Oil markets appear to have…

Alt Text

China’s CNPC Boosts Global Oil, Gas Ties

China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC)…

Alt Text

What Killed The Oil Price Rally?

A bearish report from the…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Global Energy Advisory October 6, 2017

Mexico

With new discoveries on the map and a series of auctions, Mexico’s newly liberalized energy sector looks great—on the surface. But there are plenty of things to trip up investors, and next year will be particularly decisive.

While all the news right now is of the latest round of auctions in which an Egyptian and German company signed deals to partner with Mexico’s state-run Pemex for two onshore oilfields, what’s buried in this story is significant.

Yes, Wednesday tender announcements are important: It’s only the second time Mexico has offered outsiders partnerships with Pemex. A third block up for auction in shallow waters garnered no interest at all, but what investors should really be paying attention to is the bigger picture.

Three years ago, Mexico opened its energy sector to private investments in a landmark energy reform that ended more than seven decades of monopoly by state-run Pemex. Supermajors Exxon, Chevron, and BP are opening or planning to open their first service stations to tap into the Mexican refined products market. Shell is the latest Big Oil player to have entered Mexico’s retail market, pledging US$1 billion in investment over the next 10 years.

But the real game here is shale, or unconventional oil and gas. And this is where things get tricky. Mexico has postponed this much more crucial auction twice now. Most recently, it was supposed to get started in December this year. It’s been postponed…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News