• 8 minutes U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 13 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 2 hours Despite pressure about Khashoggi's Murder: Saudi Arabia Reassures On Oil Supply, Says Will Meet Demand
  • 1 min Dyson Will Build Its Electric Cars in Singapore
  • 12 hours Knoema: Crude Oil Price Forecast: 2018, 2019 and Long Term to 2030
  • 16 hours Iraq war and Possible Lies
  • 2 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 2 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 19 hours A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 13 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 12 hours Get on Those Bicycles to Save the World
  • 8 hours Merkel Aims To Ward Off Diesel Car Ban In Germany
  • 3 hours Aramco to Become Major Player in LNG?
  • 3 hours Why I Think Natural Gas is the Logical Future of Energy
  • 34 mins How Long Until We Have Working Nuclear Fusion Reactor?
Alt Text

U.S. Oil Companies Face $240 Billion Debt Mountain

U.S. oil producers are facing…

Alt Text

Trump Threatens Iran’s Oil Clients

Trump has directed yet another…

Alt Text

How A Carbon Tax Would Be Implemented

A rather simple solution to…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Global Energy Advisory April 21, 2017

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• The referendum to change Turkey into an executive presidential system has passed with the narrowest of margins, even though the opposition and EU bodies claim that 2.5 million votes could have been manipulated. With all votes counted, supporters of the proposal had 51.3 percent of votes cast, and opponents had 48.7 percent. Opposition parties had called on the electoral board to annul the referendum, but Turkey's High Electoral Board has rejected the appeal. It is certain that Turkey's shift toward a more authoritarian system will represent a dramatic change for Turkey domestically in the long term. The vote has shown just how deeply polarized the Turkish electorate has become. The proposal went through despite losing the three largest cities in the vote — Istanbul, Ankara, and Izmir. On other hand, the country’s foreign policy will remain largely unchanged. It will continue its focus in northern Iraq and Syria in order to contain Kurdish strength and expansion. The European Union has taken a measured stance on the referendum issue, aware that it must tread carefully with its relations to Turkey, which it considers a major partner in gas matters and a key alternative to Gazprom’s gas routes. Also, the EU understands that they still need Turkey's cooperation in order to contain migrant traffic and keep a check on Russia. The mission of observers from the 47-member Council of Europe, the continent's leading…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News