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Global Energy Advisory – 31st October 2014

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

Turkey’s Problems on the Syrian Border

Turkey is attempting to prioritize its enemies here—an activity that has ended up placing the PKK at the top of the enemy list, followed by the Islamic State (IS). Presently, Syrian Kurds are trying to fight back IS forces in Kobani and Turkish interference is going to weaken their effort, which in turn will eventually render IS enemy number one. Turkey is pitting two groups of Kurds against each other, the Iraqi Kurds against the PKK and their Syrian counterparts, the PYD. Erdogan’s plan appears to be to allow the IS to operate unimpeded in the short-term; carry on a long-term war against Damascus; and deal with the Kurds in the immediate-medium term.   

Tensions in southeastern Turkey have reached new highs, with Kurdish protesters taking to the streets to demonstrate against the IS assault on Kobani and the Turkish government’s handling of the situation. Almost 40 people have been killed in clashes between Kurds and Turkish radical Islamist groups in the area.

On 24 October, three PKK members were killed in clashes with Turkish forces at a hydroelectric power plant in Kagizman in Kars province. The PKK were purportedly attempted to take over the power plant, but we cannot confirm this and the reporting on the incident is sketchy.  

Earlier this week, a member of a Turkish Islamist group that is a known enemy of the PKK was assassinated…

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