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Global Energy Advisory - 2nd January 2015

Global Incident Report

• Fires last week at three of five Libyan oil-storage tanks at the country’s largest oil port, Es Sider, have been extinguished. The tanks had a total capacity of 6.2 million barrels of oil. The government controlled by Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni is asking for international help due to possible environmental damage from the fires. The parallel government, controlled by Islamist-backed Omar al-Hassi, had ordered the capture of export terminals in Libya, and the fires were the result of this armed conflict. The fires started on 25 December, and were the result of Islamist rocket fire.

• Earlier this week, Syrian officials claimed that suicide bombers attacked natural gas facilities in the central province of Homs, killing eight people and wounding a dozen others. The suicide bombers detonated their devices before reaching their ultimate targets.

• Local Iraqi officials in the key oil-producing area of Basra are attempting to cancel a $17 billion gas deal with Shell, claiming that the pace of development has been too slow and the province should have more control over the process and the natural resources in Basra. The existing contract is with Shell and Mitsubishi and allows for the capturing of flared gas in three southern oilfields. The contract was signed in late November and at the time of signing was met with strong objections from the Basra local council, which was not included in the deal. In response,…

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