• 6 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 1 hour Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 2 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 37 mins Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 6 hours Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 10 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 11 hours Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 11 hours Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 6 hours Why hydrogen economics is does not work
  • 13 hours Monsanto hit by $289 Million for cancerous weedkiller
  • 19 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 19 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 17 hours Saudi Aramco IPO Seems Unlikely
  • 3 hours < sigh > $90 Oil Is A Very Real Possibility
Alt Text

Diesel Trucks Aren’t Going Anywhere

In trucking, diesel will be…

Alt Text

China’s Oil Futures Jump To Record High

China’s Yuan denominated crude futures…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Global Energy Advisory 28th July 2017

Refinery

Nigeria, exempt from OPEC’s oil output cut deal, has agreed to stop ramping up its production once it hits 1.8 million barrels per day. A milestone that is nearing, with output hitting 1.733 million bpd in June, according to secondary sources. Secondary-source data is considered closer to reality than self-reported output from OPEC members. For June, for example, the head of the NNPC said that Nigeria was producing 2.2 million barrels per day.

Just days after the cap announcement helped lift international oil prices, a militant attack took down the Trans-Niger pipeline, cutting out 150,000 bpd in daily production. What the incident highlights yet again is that improvements in Nigeria’s oil output are far from consistent for the time being.

So, while the willingness to cap production at a certain level boosted optimism, it was only for a short while. The report of the militant attack and its consequences is likely to have more of an impact on prices unless headwinds such as Libya’s unbound production growth prevail. Libya announced that it isn’t planning to join any agreement to curb output until it reaches its target of 1.25 million barrels per day by the end of the year.

These headwinds have weakened recently amid four consecutive weeks of oil inventory draws in the U.S. and indications of a slow-down in production growth across the shale patch. This has served to prop up prices somewhat, aided by an announcement from Saudi Arabia…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News