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Global Energy Advisory 24th June 2016

Global Energy Advisory 24th June 2016

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

Brazil: If you aren’t interested in what’s going there, you should be. It’s fascinating to the private intelligence world—and to geopolitical analysts in general—that the Western public is so unequivocally uninterested in Latin America. The imagination is instead only captured by jihadist movements that happen much, much further away, or by the Russian ‘bear’, which has not failed to tantalize and thrill for decades. But when major events are happening much closer to home, it fails to captivate. From a global economic and geopolitical perspective, you should be very concerned about what comes next in Brazil. But again, if there is no blood, no beheading, no pseudo-religious angle—major world developments fall on deaf ears. Let’s change that: Washington certainly has—even if it’s not obvious to you from media coverage. Nonetheless, this is our new strategic front line, and it’s not just about Brazil—please pay attention to what’s going on in Venezuela, as well. And it has as much to do with China as anything else. China is Brazil’s biggest trading partner, and it’s doubly important that this is in the U.S.’ back yard. What Washington definitely doesn’t want happening is China fully and irrevocably connecting up with South America, and the only way to ensure that does not happen is to make sure that Brazil (among others, but this…

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