• 2 minutes Oil prices going down
  • 11 minutes China & India in talks to form anti-OPEC
  • 16 minutes When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 4 hours Oil prices going down
  • 9 hours We Need A Lasting Solution To The Lies Told By Big Oil and API
  • 9 hours Another WTH? Example of Cheap Renewables
  • 3 days Bullish and bearish outlook for oil
  • 3 days Rolls Royce shedding 4,600 jobs
  • 1 day Trump Hits China With Tariffs On $50 Billion Of Goods
  • 23 mins What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 2 days When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 9 hours The Wonderful U.S. Oil Trade Deficit with Canada
  • 2 days Russia's Rosneft 'Comfortable' With $70-$80 Oil Ahead of OPEC Talks
  • 3 days After Trump-KJU, Trump-Putin Summit
  • 2 hours China & India in talks to form anti-OPEC
  • 8 hours The Permian Mystery
  • 2 hours No LNG Pipelines? Let the Trucks Roll In
  • 3 days U.S. Cars Will No Longer Need 55mpg Fuel Efficiency By 2025.
  • 3 days Epic Fail as Solar Crashes and Wind Refuses to Blow
Alt Text

Permian Boom Jeopardized By Pipeline Troubles

Once a magnet for investors,…

Alt Text

China’s Growing Debt Could Be Bearish For Oil Prices

China’s crackdown on corporate and…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Frac-Sands Poised For Huge Growth Despite Low Oil Prices

The practice of hydraulic fracturing has rightly received a lot of the credit for allowing the U.S. to boost its oil production in recent years by as much as 60%. The U.S. is now producing more oil than it has in decades and the boom is expected to continue.

But in order to fracture a well, there is one key ingredient needed: sand. Also called “frac-sand” or more officially known as “proppant,” sand is vital to opening up shale to allow oil and gas to escape.

Here is how it works. When oil and gas companies conduct a fracking job, they send a mix of water, sand, and proprietary chemical cocktails down a well. The extraordinary pressure at which they inject the mixture fractures shale rock, and the frac-sand props open the fissures. With cracks kept open by frac-sand, oil and gas flow out from shale rock and into the well.

Frac-sand often comes from high-purity quartz and is crush resistant, allowing it stay intact while shale rock fractures. A single frac job can require several thousand tons of sand. But oil and gas companies have found that by increasing the volume of sand in the fracturing process, they can increase output, often by as much as 30%. The number of shale wells using that extra burst of sand stands at just 20%, but may rise to 80% according to RBC Capital Markets.

All of this is creating a run on frac-sand, which has turned into a booming industry virtually overnight (see chart).

Prices have climbed…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News