• 5 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 9 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 15 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 59 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 15 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 6 hours Saudi-Kuwaiti Talks on Shared Oil Stall Over Chevron
  • 4 hours Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 5 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
  • 22 hours Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 6 hours These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
  • 1 hour EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 5 hours Coal remains a major source of power in Europe.
  • 1 day COLORADO FOCUS: Stocks to Watch Prior to Midterms
  • 1 hour U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 13 hours Poland signs 20-year deal on U.S. LNG supplies
  • 1 day UN Report Suggests USD $240 Per Gallon Gasoline Tax to Fight Global Warming
Alt Text

Oil Markets Take A Bearish Turn

Oil markets appear to have…

Alt Text

US Demands For More Oil Could Backfire

The State Department’s request for…

Martin Tillier

Martin Tillier

More Info

Trending Discussions

Emerson Electric (EMR): Even The Opportunity For A Profit Makes Me Mad

As I advance in years I find that, unlike many people, fewer things make me angry. I guess I am just coming to terms with the fact that the world doesn’t always operate in the way I think it should, but seems to be doing pretty well all the same. One thing, however, that does still stir some anger and frustration is when a corporation, or more accurately its stock, is punished for poor short term results when the long term outlook is positive. Such is the case with Emerson Electric (EMR).

When, in early August, Emerson announced their earnings and revenue for the last quarter were slightly shy of expectations the stock got punished. Then, when they announced plans to divest themselves of a part of their business that had become a drag on profitability, their power transmission business, traders once again marked the stock lower. Initially lost in all of this was that orders for the company have been growing at a steady 5-6 percent month on month for a while and look like continuing to do so.

A large part of that growth has come from their Process Management Division and more specifically from that division’s business servicing the oil & gas industry. The continued expansion of that business and the current retrofitting of many power generation plants around the U.S. both would indicate that EMR can not only sustain that level of growth, but quite possibly exceed it over the next few years.

In that case, a stock that is basically flat…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News