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Dan Dicker

Dan Dicker

Dan Dicker is a 25 year veteran of the New York Mercantile Exchange where he traded crude oil, natural gas, unleaded gasoline and heating oil…

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Three Trends Energy Investors Should be Following

I don’t spend much time finding very short-term trades, as regular readers know.  Staring at my screens and trying to find a great long-term trade hasn’t been a breeze either.  It’s not that the trends aren’t there to be found; it’s more that there are few ways I see right now to put them in actionable motion.

But noting those trends are the first step and I see three of them, with the actual trades following later.  They are:

1-    The inexorably rising price of crude
2-    The relative advantage of US Exploration and Production and
3-    The Liquid Natural Gas opportunity

Finding trades to go with these energy trends is the trick (and one I’d like to hear your opinions on), so let’s go through the trade opportunities on each of them as I see them today.

I’ve written dozens of columns on the trade opportunity in oil itself.  With an increasing global demand profile and a rising cost in procuring the average barrel of crude, it’s far, far more likely we’ll see $125 oil before we see $75 oil – and $150 oil after that.  One opportunity I’ve continued to see (and hold) is back month crude futures, which continue at a (lesser but still holding) backwardation, meaning that crude priced two years from now is actually trading MORE CHEAPLY than now. That still presents to me as perhaps the best trade in the…




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