• 7 minutes Does S Arabia Have 2 Mln Barrels in Spare Capacity?
  • 16 minutes Google, Hit With Record $5 billion EU Antitrust fine, To Appeal
  • 23 minutes 67.50 was the low for now, $70 - $76+ back in play
  • 1 day Venezuela, the largest oil reserve in the world, faces deep shortages of motor oil
  • 1 day EU And Japan Sign Historic Free Trade Deal
  • 3 hours Trudeau Shuffles Cabinet, Seeks To Reduce Reliance On U.S.
  • 1 day Where 3 Million Electric Vehicle Batteries Will Go When They Retire?
  • 7 hours Daimler and BMW Will Beat Tesla in EV Race
  • 2 hours Chartist predicting a $1 fall, after WTI drops $10
  • 1 day China’s Technology Sector Takes On Silicon Valley
  • 20 hours Chile Becomes The Latest Country To Commit To 100% Renewables
  • 1 day Germany: We Can No Longer Fully Rely On U.S. White House
  • 1 day Trump-Putin Helsinki Summit And Oil Prices
  • 2 days Well from $74 we hit 67.xx now what?
  • 2 days Rio Tinto Says $4-Million Goodbye to Coal
  • 2 days Trade War of 1930s, Extended the Great Depression
Alt Text

Libyan Oil Production Is Only Heading Lower

Libya’s two National Oil Companies…

Alt Text

Downside Risk Remains In Oil Markets

Oil market sentiment is as…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

East Asia Energy Advisory

Japan’s nuclear dilemma and Asia’s LNG hunger.

Japan

The pro-nuclear camp has won the critical 9 February Tokyo gubernatorial elections, and while this is not a straight-out victory for the pro-nuclear forces, it was a decisive election that, had it gone the other way, would have certainly been a defeat for Japanese nuclear energy. Former health and welfare minister Yoichi Masuzoe won the elections, backed by pro-nuclear Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as well as the Japan Trade Union Confederation, of which Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is a member.

The issue of whether to scrap nuclear energy entirely in the wake of the Fukushima disaster had threatened to take precedence over other critical socio-economic issues, such as health care, and the 2020 Olympic Games. Masuzoe was the only “pro-nuclear” candidate running in the election—against a powerful “zero-nuclear” force that included gubernatorial candidate Morihiro Hosowaka, a former prime minister himself, backed by former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi.

While Hosokawa and another candidate, Kenji Utsunomiya, called for a permanent moratorium on nuclear power generation, Masuzoe lent his support to a gradual decrease of reliance on nuclear power to eventually be replaced by renewable energy. Together, Hosokawa and Utsunomiya won about 40% of the vote.

This gubernatorial election was critical because Tokyo consumes about 10% of Japan’s electricity,…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News