• 5 minutes Covid-19 logarithmic growth
  • 8 minutes Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 12 minutes Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 14 minutes China Takes Axe To Alternative Energy Funding, Slashing Subsidies For Solar And Wind
  • 2 hours Cpt Lauren Dowsett
  • 2 hours Trump will meet with executives in the energy industry to discuss the impact of COVID-19
  • 28 mins Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 42 mins Marine based energy generation
  • 29 mins What If ‘We’d Adopted A More Conventional Response To This Epidemic?’
  • 5 hours Which producers will shut in first?
  • 3 hours How to Create a Pandemic
  • 3 hours CDC covid19 coverup?
  • 3 hours Iran-Turkey gas pipeline goes kaboom. Bad people blamed.
  • 21 hours The Most Annoying Person You Have Encountered During Lockdown
  • 24 hours Pumping Dollar V Pumping Oil Match
  • 14 hours The idea that electric cars are lowering demand is ridiculous.
  • 15 hours Russia's Rosneft Oil Company announces termination of its activity in Venezuela

Breaking News:

IEA: OPEC Can’t Save The Oil Market

East Asia Energy Advisory

Japan’s nuclear dilemma and Asia’s LNG hunger.

Japan

The pro-nuclear camp has won the critical 9 February Tokyo gubernatorial elections, and while this is not a straight-out victory for the pro-nuclear forces, it was a decisive election that, had it gone the other way, would have certainly been a defeat for Japanese nuclear energy. Former health and welfare minister Yoichi Masuzoe won the elections, backed by pro-nuclear Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as well as the Japan Trade Union Confederation, of which Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is a member.

The issue of whether to scrap nuclear energy entirely in the wake of the Fukushima disaster had threatened to take precedence over other critical socio-economic issues, such as health care, and the 2020 Olympic Games. Masuzoe was the only “pro-nuclear” candidate running in the election—against a powerful “zero-nuclear” force that included gubernatorial candidate Morihiro Hosowaka, a former prime minister himself, backed by former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi.

While Hosokawa and another candidate, Kenji Utsunomiya, called for a permanent moratorium on nuclear power generation, Masuzoe lent his support to a gradual decrease of reliance on nuclear power to eventually be replaced by renewable energy. Together, Hosokawa and Utsunomiya won about 40% of the vote.

This gubernatorial election was critical because Tokyo consumes about 10% of Japan’s electricity,…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News