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Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

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Consumer Authority Rejects Tesla Model 3

Elon Musk

Consumer Reports, the product review and rating magazine, has decided not to recommend Tesla Model 3 to its readers after doing a series of tests on the vehicle. The tests, according to Consumer Reports, revealed that the Model 3 took longer to stop than comparable cars and that the braking test results were non-repeatable.

The magazine’s editors note that the first braking test revealed a shorter stopping distance than comparable cars, the next few tests that sought to prove the first result repeatable, ended with longer stopping distances. The results still could not be repeated a day later, after the brakes had been left to cool off, and with another Model 3 borrowed from a private owner to ensure the problem is not with the CR vehicle.

In a written response to Green Car Reports, which carried the CR story, Tesla said that "Tesla’s own testing has found braking distances with an average of 133 feet when conducting the 60-0 mph stops using the 18” Michelin all season tire and as low as 126 feet with all tires currently available. Stopping distance results are affected by variables such as road surface, weather conditions, tire temperature, brake conditioning, outside temperature, and past driving behavior that may have affected the brake system.” Related: Iran Prepares For Oil Production Decline

It was the braking that stopped the CR editors from giving a recommendation to the Model 3, but it wasn’t the only issue they found with the car. The magazine’s editors were also unhappy with the touchscreen on the dashboard, noting that simple tasks required multiple steps that could make driving dangerous, the excessive wind noise at higher speeds, and the door handles. Also, they judged the Model 3 as a stiff ride.

On the plus side, CR had kind words about the Model 3’s range, which at 350 miles is the longest range of an electric car tested by the magazine. Other positive feedback had to do with its handling, steering, and power.

Meanwhile, Elon Musk has been tweeting about a dual-motor Model 3 in a new version—all-wheel drive performance—that will have a range of 310 miles, a top speed of 115 mph, and will cost US$78,000, comparing it to a BMW M3 “but 15% quicker & with better handling.”

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

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  • John Scior on May 30 2018 said:
    I would like to see Tesla cut out the autonomous goal of its vehicles. It is a great idea, however having an autopilot gives careless drivers something else to blame when something goes wrong. I read headlines about Tesla drivers blaming the autopilot when they get in a crash and even though later investigations may prove otherwise, that it was the driver at fault, the headlines give bad publicity to the EV industry. EV does pose a significant paradigm shift if Lockheed Martin can bring their compact fusion generator to market efficiently or other 4th gen nuclear reactors and technology can be employed to lower electricity rates, then EV could really take off in displacing CE technology. Also once they reach a certain market penetration, the whole charging / recharging idea wont seem so strange. Also there will come a point of production where economies of scale will make batteries much more affordable so that higher initial upfront investment necessitated by EV may indeed disappear.

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