• 4 minutes China goes against US natural gas
  • 12 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 15 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 hour Downloadable 3D Printed Gun Designs, Yay or Nay?
  • 6 hours Rattling With Weapons: Iran Must Develop Military To Guard Against Other Powers
  • 12 hours Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 1 hour Russians hacking vs U.S., Microsoft President: Russians Targeting All Political Sides
  • 1 hour VW Receives Massive Order Of 1,600 All-Electric Trucks
  • 9 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 13 hours CO2 Emissions Hit 67-Year Low In USA, As Rest-Of-World Rises
  • 6 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 16 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 21 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 7 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 23 hours How To Explain 'Truth Isn't Truth' Comment of Rudy Giuliani?
  • 21 hours The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
Alt Text

Oil Prices Fall Despite Supply Fears

Oil prices started the day…

Alt Text

Iran Sanctions Could Backfire On U.S. Drillers

After the U.S. announced new…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

2 Answers to The Most Profitable Question in Energy

There’s one question that’s on the minds of energy investors the world over. Where will be the next place for shale gas and oil?

It’s worth pondering. The profits won from pioneering shale developments in the U.S. have revolutionized the energy world. Rapidly creating a host of new plays—nearly from scratch.

The question is becoming especially important these days. With exploration and development costs rising around the world, big oil has made a concerted push of late to focus on shale. An arena where the huge scale of development provides enough upside to be high-impact—even for the world’s largest E&Ps.

There have been a lot of enticing geological assessments on the global potential for similar shale developments. Indeed, such oil- and gas-bearing rocks are common in many parts of the globe. With assessed potential running in the trillions of cubic feet, and billions of barrels.

But answering the question of shale’s next big find requires more than just good geology. It also takes the right people, equipment and know-how to get the petroleum out of the ground. And make a profit in the process.

That’s been easier said than done outside of the U.S to date. Shale drilling has been tried in places like China, Chile and Europe. In some the cases, the technical results have even been on par with initial production rates and reserves potential in U.S. plays.

But the killer problem has been…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News