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2 Answers to The Most Profitable Question in Energy

There’s one question that’s on the minds of energy investors the world over. Where will be the next place for shale gas and oil?

It’s worth pondering. The profits won from pioneering shale developments in the U.S. have revolutionized the energy world. Rapidly creating a host of new plays—nearly from scratch.

The question is becoming especially important these days. With exploration and development costs rising around the world, big oil has made a concerted push of late to focus on shale. An arena where the huge scale of development provides enough upside to be high-impact—even for the world’s largest E&Ps.

There have been a lot of enticing geological assessments on the global potential for similar shale developments. Indeed, such oil- and gas-bearing rocks are common in many parts of the globe. With assessed potential running in the trillions of cubic feet, and billions of barrels.

But answering the question of shale’s next big find requires more than just good geology. It also takes the right people, equipment and know-how to get the petroleum out of the ground. And make a profit in the process.

That’s been easier said than done outside of the U.S to date. Shale drilling has been tried in places like China, Chile and Europe. In some the cases, the technical results have even been on par with initial production rates and reserves potential in U.S. plays.

But the killer problem has been…

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