• 3 minutes UAE says four vessels subjected to 'sabotage' near Fujairah port
  • 6 minutes Why is Strait of Hormuz the World's Most Important Oil Artery
  • 8 minutes OPEC is no longer an Apex Predator
  • 12 minutes Mueller Report Brings Into Focus Obama's Attempted Coup Against Trump
  • 2 hours Australian Voters Reject 'Climate Change' Politicians
  • 8 hours Australia Election Summary: "This was the Climate Change Cult Election, and the Climate Change Cult Lost"
  • 49 mins Shale to be profitable in 2019!!!
  • 12 hours Canada's Uncivil Oil War : 78% of Voters Cite *Energy* as the Top Issue
  • 3 hours Global Warming Making The Rich Richer
  • 16 hours IMO2020 To scrub or not to scrub
  • 16 hours California Threatens Ban on ICE Cars
  • 16 hours China Downplays Chances For Trade Talks While U.S. Plays ‘Little Tricks’
  • 17 mins Oil Price Editorial: Beware Of Saudi Oil Tanker Sabotage Stories
  • 2 hours Shell ‘to have commercial wind farms’ by early 2020s
  • 8 hours Misunderstanding between USA and Iran the cause of current stand off, I call BS
  • 16 hours Wonders of Shale- Gas,bringing investments and jobs to the US
  • 8 hours DUG Rockies: Plenty Of Promise, Despite The Politics
  • 12 hours Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe

Mali: Straight out of Conflict into Exploration

Mali can barely be called “post-conflict”—despite the rhetoric following the conclusion of 11 August runoff elections—yet oil exploration deals are already being cut in the north. Indeed, they were being made even before the election, a bit on the sly. So what can we expect?

Exploration is targeting the extremely volatile North—the scene of the recent bloody conflict—and what we can expect will depend on how well the government does in turning separatists into hydrocarbon stakeholders. It could be brilliant. It could be the foundation for a revived conflict.

This is the situation in Mali right now:

Despite elections, there has been no tangible change in the security or economic situation. The only significant outcome of the elections is that it unleashes $4 billion in foreign aid, which will remain in the capital city.

The North remains largely controlled by separatists and sporadic fighting is still a problem. Jihadist forces continue to find easy recruits in Mali regardless of ideological lines, simply because they can pay fighters more.

Fractious groupings loosely linked to al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) are regrouping and uniting based on where the biggest funding flows from smuggling are. They pose an increasing threat to Niger, Chad, Mauritania, Algeria, Morocco, Libya and Tunisia.

Economic growth remains at a 10-year low—and this would be even lower were it not for continued gold…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News