X

Sign Up To Our Free Newsletter

Join Now

Thanks for subscribing to our free newsletter!

ERROR

  • 4 minutes IMPORTANT ARTICLE BY OILPRICE.COM EDITOR - "Naked Short Selling: The Truth Is Much Worse Than You Have Been Told"
  • 5 minutes “Cushing Oil Inventories Are Soaring Again” By Tsvetana Paraskova
  • 7 minutes United States LNG Exports Reach Third Place
  • 24 mins Texas forced to have rolling black outs. Not from downed power line , but because the wind energy turbines are frozen.
  • 12 hours Wednesday Nikki Haley reached out to Trump for meeting at Mar-a-lago. Trump said No ! You blew it Nikki . . .
  • 18 hours NYT:  The Supreme Court’s order (Re:  Trump’s tax returns) set in motion a series of events that could lead to the startling possibility of a criminal trial of a former U.S. president
  • 2 hours The World Economic Forum & Davos - Setting the agenda on fossil fuels, global regulations, etc.
  • 4 hours Retired RAF pilot wins legal challenge over a wind farm
  • 21 hours The latest GOP nonsense on Texas shows us the future Republicans want
  • 3 hours Minerals, Mining and Industrial Ecology
  • 20 hours Disaster looming in UK offshore wind power
  • 1 day The Cyberpandemic has Begun: SolarWinds + FireEye – Gmail & Google services down
  • 22 hours U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes

Coal is Dying; Avoid These Companies

We have all heard about the doom and gloom that the U.S. coal sector is facing – a double-whammy of abundant supplies of cheap shale gas coupled with the regulatory noose that the Environmental Protection Agency is continuously tightening around the industry. Together these two forces are undermining the economics of coal.

Although the projections for the U.S. coal industry seem to get worse by the month, such a trend is not really news. But what is news is the emerging realization that globally the outlook is not much better. Coal executives used to insist that while the U.S. is turning its back on one of the few cheap sources of base load power, growth in global demand – particularly from China and India – was nearly insatiable.

Just this past December the International Energy Agency predicted robust demand for coal over the next five years. “We have heard many pledges and policies aimed at mitigating climate change, but over the next five years they will mostly fail to arrest the growth in coal demand,” IEA Executive Director Maria van der Hoeven said in a December 2014 statement on the release of a major coal report. In that report – released a mere four months ago – the IEA predicted that China would fail in its attempts to reach “peak coal” before the end of the decade.

But data that only emerged a few weeks later proved the IEA’s prediction to be way off base. China actually reduced its coal…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News