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Camelina – Tomorrow’s Biofuel, Today

(Dan Dicker is currently on vacation and will be back with us next week. To fill in we have prepared a special report on the biofuel – Camelina which we believe is an area energy investors should be keeping a close eye on.)

I also wanted to let you know that we have a detailed bonus report for subscribers coming out next week that looks at: 10 Oil & Gas Trends that Will Change the Way You Invest.

It’s taken quite a while to put together and is definitely something that investors and energy professionals will not want to miss. I’m hoping we’ll be able to get it to you by Thursday.

In the race for renewable biofuels, the three leading U.S. contenders are algae, jatropha and camelina.

All have their passionate advocates, but amidst the partisan campaigning, camelina is emerging at the initial winner, with enormous potential implications for U.S. agronomy and companies involved in its cultivation.

On 26 February camelina received approval from the U.S. government’s Environmental Protection Agency as a new low-carbon feedstock under the federal government’s Renewable Fuel Standard program.

The RFS originated with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and was expanded and extended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 and requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of renewable fuels to be blended into transportation fuel in increasing amounts each year, escalating to…




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