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Saudi Arabia Books $29-Bln Deficit In Q2

Saudi Arabia booked a deficit of $29 billion for the second quarter of the year because of the continued slump in oil prices and oil demand, which affected revenues.

Reuters reports the Kingdom’s oil revenues for April to June were down 45 percent on the year, with total budget revenues down 49 percent from a year earlier.

Saudi Arabia has taken some austerity steps already in an attempt to rein in public spending and mitigate the impact of the oil crisis on its economy, but it seems more would be needed.

“A pullback in spending is essential for containing the deficit,” Reuters quoted Monica Malik, chief economist at Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank, as saying. “The proactive stance of the government was already reflected in the austerity measures announced in April. However, these will dampen the recovery outlook.”

So far this year the Saudi government has announced a cut in 2020 budget expenditures of $13.2 billion through “a partial reduction in some items with the least social and economic impact,” along with a tripling of value-added tax to 15 percent from 5 percent and a suspension of the so-called cost-of-living allowances for all Saudi public servants, who are the majority of Saudis in employment.

The problem with these austerity measures is that they may slow down the economy’s recovery once the crisis is over. And the fact that the Kingdom also plans to borrow a lot to get through the worst of it is not helping, either, because loans need to be repaid. For now, there is a strong interest in Saudi debt, but if we are indeed past peak oil demand, this may change before long. So far this year, Riyadh has borrowed almost $13 billion on the international and domestic markets.

The IMF expects Saudi Arabia’s economy to contract by 6.8 percent this year. The Kingdom itself has called the figure pessimistic.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

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  • Mamdouh Salameh on July 29 2020 said:
    I calculated that Saudi Arabia is expected to have a budget deficit estimated at $116 bn this year as a result of low oil prices triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Saudi Arabia announced a budget of $272 bn for 2020 based on a revenue of $222 bn (833 billion Saudi Riyals). However, Saudi oil export revenue which accounts for 90% of total budget revenue isn’t projected to exceed $83.0 bn this year creating a budget estimated at $116 bn.

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) expects Saudi Arabia’s economy to contract by 6.8% this year.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London
  • Jan Ghafour Wahab on July 29 2020 said:
    Saudi Arabia has put itself in a predicament, it should’ve started an oilfund long before and transfered the surplus of the oilmoney there instead of spending money on unnessesary luxury.

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