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Why Russia Fails To Speed Up Production Cuts

Why Russia Fails To Speed Up Production Cuts

Russia pledged to speed up…

James Burgess

James Burgess

James Burgess studied Business Management at the University of Nottingham. He has worked in property development, chartered surveying, marketing, law, and accounts. He has also…

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Oil Companies Race Back to the Gulf of Mexico

Following the infamous BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico back in 2010, all deepwater drilling in the area was shut down, and the whole sector was sent into chaos. However now, according to GlobalData, drilling in the US Gulf of Mexico is starting to grow again, and may soon reach the levels that it was at before the spill.

The study performed by GlobalData suggests that despite the increased restrictions placed upon oil companies working in the Gulf of Mexico, and the high risks and costs involved in deep-water drilling, companies are increasing operations in the area due to the high oil prices.

In the first quarter of 2012 the US government issued 44 drilling permits for the area, compared to just 74 and 79 for the whole of 2010 and 2011 respectively. This growth will see drilling operations return to pre-2010 levels by the end of the year.

Oil companies are attracted to the Gulf of Mexico mainly due to the stable political environment and clear regulations. Operations in oil fields in other parts of the world are constantly under threat from changing regimes, and local unrest. However in February of this year the US and Mexican governments signed an agreement which set a clear framework for the exploration and extraction of oil in the Gulf.

RELATED: Shell to Build the World's First Ever Floating LNG Plant

Major international oil companies dominate deepwater drilling in the Gulf due to the necessity for high technological expertise, the high set up costs, and the potential multi-billion dollar liability rick if anything bad goes wrong. Of the 44 licenses that were granted, BP received 13, and Chevron 14.

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



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  • Scottar on September 29 2012 said:
    Just goes to show you, just can't beat oil. So called renewables will depend on oil and gas, if not nuclear, for their very existence. But once people figure out that wind and PV solar really don't save on oil or gas in grid support, they will be off the meal subsidy ticket.

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