• 5 minutes Rage Without Proof: Maduro Accuses U.S. Official Of Plotting Venezuela Invasion
  • 11 minutes IEA Sees Global Oil Supply Tightening More Quickly In 2019
  • 14 minutes Paris Is Burning Over Climate Change Taxes -- Is America Next?
  • 3 hours Waste-to-Energy Chugging Along
  • 7 hours Contradictory: Euro Zone Takes Step To Deeper Integration, Key Issues Unresolved
  • 5 hours Venezuela continues to sink in misery
  • 3 hours U.S. Senate Advances Resolution To End Military Support For Saudis In Yemen
  • 3 hours No, The U.S. Is Not A Net Exporter Of Crude Oil
  • 5 hours Regular Gas dropped to $2.21 per gallon today
  • 3 hours Zohr Giant Gas Field Increases Production Six-Fold
  • 15 hours What will the future hold for nations dependent on high oil prices.
  • 15 hours Air-to-Fuels Energy and Cost Calculation
  • 13 hours $867 billion farm bill passed
  • 23 hours Has Global Peak Diesel Arrived?
  • 4 hours Global Economy-Bad Days Are coming
  • 11 hours USGS Announces Largest Continuous Oil Assessment in Texas and New Mexico
Alt Text

The Biggest Threat To Australia’s LNG Sector

Australia, one of the world’s…

Alt Text

One Houston Gas Player Is Changing The LNG Business Forever

Houston-based Tellurian Inc. has announced…

Alt Text

What’s Behind The Plunge In LNG Prices?

Warmer weather in Asia has…

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy

Charles is a writer for Oilprice.com

More Info

Trending Discussions

Shell to Build the World's First Ever Floating LNG Plant

For more than a decade the natural gas industry has been looking for a way to move LNG onto barges at sea in order to avoid the escalating costs of onshore plants. Royal Dutch Shell has just taken the first step to realising that goal by placing an order for the first ever floating LNG plant.

The vessel, called Prelude, will be the largest in the world, weighing six times more than the largest aircraft carrier, and measuring more in length than the Empire State building is in height. The huge ship will be built in Korea and then moved to the north-west coast of Australia, where it will provide a cheaper option to onshore LNG plants there. The project is expected to cost Shell around $13 billion, but that is far less than the $20 billion that it costs to typically build an onshore facility.

Shell Prelude FLNG

When they approved the project last year, Shell estimated that Prelude will produce about 3.6 million metric tons of LNG and 1.3 million tons of gas condensate a year, and cost about $3 - $3.5 billion per million tons of LNG produced.

In comparison, Inpex Corp approved the construction of an onshore facility earlier this year, which will have a capacity of 8.4 million tons a year, cost $34 billion to build, and more than $4 billion per million tons of LNG produced.

Figures like this are causing Woodside, the Perth-based operator of the planned Browse LNG facility, to scrap their plans for the $44 billion plant and invest in a FLNG vessel instead.

Neil Gilmour, Shell’s FLNG (floating LNG) general manager, explained that the offshore plant is much cheaper than the onshore plant because they “remove the need for the pipeline and use about 50 percent of the raw materials for an equivalent onshore plant.”

RELATED: Oil Companies Race Back to the Gulf of Mexico

According to Deutsche Banke AG, demand for LNG will more than double to about 460 million tons per year by 2025; and BP Plc suggest that FLNG will supply about three percent of that volume.

Other companies looking to follow Shell into the FLNG sector include; Petronas, ConocoPhillips, GDF Suez, and PTT Exploration & Production Plc.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Minwoo Kim on September 21 2012 said:
    The World Goes Solar. Japan's FiT in July is among the highest in the world. It's clear that Japan's FiT will shake the solar market. Now, US has the same options. New solutions will be showed in Japan. This is it!
    As you know, earthquake in Japan is happening frequently. Floating solar panels installation is one of the best solutions for power crisis in Japan. So you have to reduce vibration to install Floating solar panels. Because, it makes many kinds of problems! Vibrations caused by wind, waves and external forces. New Floating Body Stabilizer for Floating solar panels installation has been created in South Korea. The Floating Body Stabilizers generate drag force immediately when Floating solar panels are being rolled and pitched on the water. Recently, these Floating Body Stabilizers have been used to reduce vibration of Floating Solar Panels in South Korea. You can see New Floating Body Stabilizer videos in YouTube. http://youtu.be/O2oys_YHhCc, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nA_xFp5ktbU&feature=youtu.be.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News