• 2 minutes Oil prices going down
  • 11 minutes China & India in talks to form anti-OPEC
  • 16 minutes When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 8 hours Oil prices going down
  • 13 hours We Need A Lasting Solution To The Lies Told By Big Oil and API
  • 14 hours Another WTH? Example of Cheap Renewables
  • 3 days Bullish and bearish outlook for oil
  • 1 hour What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 1 day Trump Hits China With Tariffs On $50 Billion Of Goods
  • 3 days Rolls Royce shedding 4,600 jobs
  • 2 days When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 13 hours The Wonderful U.S. Oil Trade Deficit with Canada
  • 2 days Russia's Rosneft 'Comfortable' With $70-$80 Oil Ahead of OPEC Talks
  • 6 hours China & India in talks to form anti-OPEC
  • 3 days U.S. Cars Will No Longer Need 55mpg Fuel Efficiency By 2025.
  • 1 hour Australia mulls LNG import
  • 12 hours The Permian Mystery
  • 6 hours No LNG Pipelines? Let the Trucks Roll In
  • 1 day Gazprom Exports to EU Hit Record
Alt Text

Kurdistan Proposes Immediate Ceasefire With Iraq

The Kurdistan Regional Government has…

Alt Text

Tax Income Earned ISIS Much More Than Oil Smuggling

Contrary to popular belief, black…

Alt Text

Will The U.S. Push Venezuela Into The Abyss?

Maduro claimed victory in Venezuela’s…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Qatar's Agenda in Syria

Situation: Qatar continues to funnel weapons and facilitate other assistance to Syrian rebels and Salafi jihadists fighting the Assad regime in Syria.

Bottom Line: Determining the outcome of the conflict in Syria is very difficult due to the sheer number of private players in this theater and the varying agendas. Determining the extent to which Qatar is willing to go is made easier by understanding what it wishes to achieve: Global stature—and a pipeline through Syria.

Analysis: Right before the conflict in Syria broke out, Iran had cut a deal with Iraq for an Iran-Iraq-Syria pipeline to pump natural gas from the world’s largest gas field, South Pars, which is shared by Qatar and Iran. Qatar could not allow this to happen. It would have given Iran the upper hand in its perceived quest to form a “Shi’ite crescent”. Qatar wanted the pipeline first. Qatar’s original plan was a pipeline from South Pars through Iraq and on to Turkey, and then to European markets. This pipeline, however, would have to traverse southern/central Iraq and Northern Iraq. This has become problematic due to the oil-resources power struggle between the Kurds of Northern Iraq and the Iraqi central government. A pipeline through Syria would be much easier. It would also be convenient for Jordan, which has apparently been promised free Qatari gas for its help in training Syrian rebels on its territory and allowing them to use Jordanian territory to launch offensives…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News