• 5 minutes Rage Without Proof: Maduro Accuses U.S. Official Of Plotting Venezuela Invasion
  • 11 minutes IEA Sees Global Oil Supply Tightening More Quickly In 2019
  • 14 minutes Paris Is Burning Over Climate Change Taxes -- Is America Next?
  • 7 hours U.S. Senate Advances Resolution To End Military Support For Saudis In Yemen
  • 10 mins Let's Just Block the Sun, Shall We?
  • 8 hours Waste-to-Energy Chugging Along
  • 13 mins Alberta govt to construct another WCS processing refinery
  • 11 hours Venezuela continues to sink in misery
  • 12 hours What will the future hold for nations dependent on high oil prices.
  • 1 day Zohr Giant Gas Field Increases Production Six-Fold
  • 15 hours Contradictory: Euro Zone Takes Step To Deeper Integration, Key Issues Unresolved
  • 20 hours UK Power and loss of power stations
  • 7 hours Regular Gas dropped to $2.21 per gallon today
  • 1 day Global Economy-Bad Days Are coming
  • 1 day No, The U.S. Is Not A Net Exporter Of Crude Oil
  • 21 hours EPA To Roll Back Carbon Rule On New Coal Plants
  • 1 hour Sleeping Hydrocarbon Giant
  • 3 hours Sane Take on the Russia-Ukraine Case

Qatar's Agenda in Syria

Situation: Qatar continues to funnel weapons and facilitate other assistance to Syrian rebels and Salafi jihadists fighting the Assad regime in Syria.

Bottom Line: Determining the outcome of the conflict in Syria is very difficult due to the sheer number of private players in this theater and the varying agendas. Determining the extent to which Qatar is willing to go is made easier by understanding what it wishes to achieve: Global stature—and a pipeline through Syria.

Analysis: Right before the conflict in Syria broke out, Iran had cut a deal with Iraq for an Iran-Iraq-Syria pipeline to pump natural gas from the world’s largest gas field, South Pars, which is shared by Qatar and Iran. Qatar could not allow this to happen. It would have given Iran the upper hand in its perceived quest to form a “Shi’ite crescent”. Qatar wanted the pipeline first. Qatar’s original plan was a pipeline from South Pars through Iraq and on to Turkey, and then to European markets. This pipeline, however, would have to traverse southern/central Iraq and Northern Iraq. This has become problematic due to the oil-resources power struggle between the Kurds of Northern Iraq and the Iraqi central government. A pipeline through Syria would be much easier. It would also be convenient for Jordan, which has apparently been promised free Qatari gas for its help in training Syrian rebels on its territory and allowing them to use Jordanian territory to launch offensives…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News