• 3 minutes Is Pete Buttigieg emerging as the most likely challenger to Trump?
  • 5 minutes CoV-19: China, WHO, myth vs fact
  • 8 minutes Question: Why are oil futures so low through 2020?
  • 11 minutes Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 4 hours Energy from thin air?
  • 16 hours Fast-charging, long-running, bendy energy storage breakthrough
  • 56 mins “The era of cheap & abundant energy is long gone. Money supply & debt have grown faster than real economy. Debt saturation is now a real risk, requiring a global scale reset.”"We are now in new era of expensive unconventional energy
  • 6 hours Hey NYC - Mayor De Blasio declares you must say goodbye to fossil fuels. Get ready to freeze your Virtue Signaling butts off.
  • 19 hours Can LNG Kill Oil?
  • 7 hours Foxconn cancelled the reopening of their mfg plants scheduled for tomorrow. Rescheduled to March 3rd. . . . if they're lucky.
  • 20 hours "For the Public's Interest"
  • 2 days Solar Cells at 25 Cents Apiece (5 cents per watt)
  • 20 hours Cheap natural gas is making it very hard to go green
  • 21 hours The New Class War Exposes the Oligarchs and Enablers
  • 2 days Has Trump put the USA at the service of Israel?
  • 2 days Trump reinvented tariffs and it worked

Iran’s Economic Liberalization Hangs on a Looming Internal Confrontation

Bottom Line: As we have mentioned previously, the 14 June election in Iran has markedly changed the political landscape and increased the chances for economic liberalization and growth, and there is one particular policy move that could make or break this.

Analysis: The unexpected victory of the pro-business faction associated with former president Hashemi Rafsanjani has the potential to drastically change the business climate in favor of domestic and foreign capital in the medium- and the long-term. The Rouhani-Rafsanjani strategy for political consolidation rests centrally on an open door policy towards foreign investment which has not been witnessed in the Islamic Republic for well over three decades—including the period spanning Rafsanjani's 8-year-long presidential terms in the late 80's and early 90's.  While many challenges still lie ahead—notably the opposition of the hardline elements in the Revolutionary Guards and elsewhere—there are reasons to be optimistic about this very outcome. First, for the first time after the 1979 revolution, the radical Right is in disarray while the Reformist-Pragmatist camp is on the ascendancy. Second, the Guards are themselves split. Third, the economic crisis has reached a point where many centrist and conservative forces like the powerful traditionalist clergy and bazaar merchant class who used to be hostile to foreign and western capital are now openly clamoring for it. A critical test case is the new…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News