• 4 minutes "Saudi Armada heading to U.S.", "Dumping" is a WTO VIOLATION.
  • 7 minutes Trump will be holding back funds that were going to W.H.O. Good move
  • 11 minutes Washington doctor removed from his post, over covid
  • 15 minutes Which producers will shut in first?
  • 49 mins Cpt Lauren Dowsett
  • 37 mins Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 4 hours Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 5 hours Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 8 hours Death Match: Climate Change vs. Coronavirus
  • 6 hours Free market or Freeloading off the work of others?
  • 6 hours ‘If it saves a life’: Power cut to 1.5 million Californians
  • 9 hours US Shale Resilience: Oil Industry Experts Say Shale Will Rise Again
  • 10 hours Ten days ago Trump sent New York Hydroxychloroquine. Being administered to infected. Covid deaths dropped last few days. Fewer on ventilators. Hydroxychloroquine "Cause and Effect" ?
  • 10 hours Russia's Rosneft Oil is screwed if they have to shut down production as a result of glut.
  • 6 hours Trump will meet with executives in the energy industry to discuss the impact of COVID-19
  • 9 hours How to Create a Pandemic

Global Energy Advisory March 24th 2017

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• Violence in South Sudan has further spiked after the announcement of a $500-million oil exploration deal between the government and Nigerian Oranto Petroleum. Rebel forces loyal to former Vice President Riek Machar have kidnapped two groups of oil workers over the past couple of weeks. One of the kidnappings involved employees of Oranto, while five others, including an engineer with the DAR consortium, were also kidnapped. The DAR consortium includes Chinese Sinopec and CNPC, and Malaysia’s Petronas. The rebels are vague on the reasons for the kidnappings. One group has said they are trying to prevent DAR from operating in South Sudan, while a separate group said it would not allow any drilling in territory they control until they are victorious over government forces. As the civil war rages on, the government still plans—unrealistically—to double its current oil production to 290,000 barrels per day in fiscal year 2017/2018, up from current output of around 130,000 barrels per day. Since its independence, South Sudan has relied on oil for all income—a situation that has significantly compounded ongoing political and economic instability due to the fall in crude oil prices. According to South Sudanese officials, production in the past reached as high as 350,000 bpd but fell after a dispute with Sudan over fees for pumping South Sudan’s crude through Sudan’s export pipeline, which led South…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News