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  • 3 minutes Texas forced to have rolling brown outs. Not from downed power line , but because the wind energy turbines are frozen.
  • 7 minutes Scientists Warn That Filling The Sahara With Solar Panels Is A Bad Idea
  • 11 minutes United States LNG Exports Reach Third Place
  • 15 minutes Joe Biden's Presidency
  • 16 hours Texas Supply Chain Massacre
  • 17 mins U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes
  • 6 hours America Makes Plans to Produce Needed Rare Earth Minerals Domestically
  • 8 hours Texas forced to have rolling black outs, primarily because of large declines in output from fossil fuel power plants
  • 12 hours Former BP Exec "Biden not in war against oil" . . Really ?
  • 2 mins Here we go - again: plug-in hybrids cost motorists more than what they were told
  • 2 days Good Marriage And Bad Divorce: Germany's Merkel Wants Britain and EU To Divorce On Good Terms
  • 2 days Speaker Pelosi, "Tear Down This Wall" . . around Capital Building
  • 3 hours An exciting development in EV Aviation: Volocopter

Global Energy Advisory April 1th 2016

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• With a great deal of help from Russia, the Assad regime has recaptured the strategic city of Palmyra from the Islamic State—a victory that should indeed to go the Russians, along with a smattering of Syrian special forces, Hezbollah forces, Iranian special forces and Iraqi Shi’ite militias. According to Assad, this victory, more than anything, demonstrated the half-hearted attempt by the global U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq. The Western media, of course, does not know how to deal with this as the gray areas are too wide. The problem they find themselves in is that the Assad regime, and Russia, as well as (uncomfortably) Hezbollah and Iran, are coming out as the good guys in this story—the only ones who have seriously confronted the terrorist threat. Not acknowledging this means evokes some equally uncomfortable realities about our fight against the Islamic State, as well as Turkey’s intentions. A lot of the geopolitics that will now arise will have to do with who is on the right side of history here, and it’s a tough case to make.

• Baghdad has bitten back at the Iraqi Kurds’ gamble on unilateral exports, and the bite is hurting a bit more than usual. The Kurds were hoping to add 150,000 barrels per day to their supply this year, but it’s now looking like it will be about 100,000 bpd at best. In the meantime, Baghdad is keeping 150,000 bpd…




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