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  • 3 minutes Texas forced to have rolling brown outs. Not from downed power line , but because the wind energy turbines are frozen.
  • 7 minutes Scientists Warn That Filling The Sahara With Solar Panels Is A Bad Idea
  • 11 minutes United States LNG Exports Reach Third Place
  • 15 minutes Joe Biden's Presidency
  • 15 hours Texas Supply Chain Massacre
  • 2 mins U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes
  • 5 hours America Makes Plans to Produce Needed Rare Earth Minerals Domestically
  • 8 hours Texas forced to have rolling black outs, primarily because of large declines in output from fossil fuel power plants
  • 12 hours Former BP Exec "Biden not in war against oil" . . Really ?
  • 2 days Good Marriage And Bad Divorce: Germany's Merkel Wants Britain and EU To Divorce On Good Terms
  • 1 hour Here we go - again: plug-in hybrids cost motorists more than what they were told
  • 2 days Speaker Pelosi, "Tear Down This Wall" . . around Capital Building
  • 3 hours An exciting development in EV Aviation: Volocopter

Global Energy Advisory – 27th November 2015

Politics, Geopolitics & Conflict

• Here’s what happens when you have two rival governments in a country where everyone thought forced regime change would be a good idea: You lose your oil deal if it’s with the ‘wrong government’. Ask Swiss-based Glencore. The ‘internationally recognized’ regime in Libya—that holed up in Benghazi—says Glencore’s oil-export deal with Tripoli is unfortunately with the wrong government as such, doesn’t exist. It also gives you a good idea about who supports which government, and why. It has less to do with the traditional elements of religion and democracy than most are conned into thinking. The Benghazi government has made it clear that it had the power to physically prevent Glencore tankers from using Libyan ports—if simply telling the company that its deal was on worthless paper wasn’t enough.

• Brazil’s state-run Petrobras appears to be getting a reprieve as a three-week strike by oil workers winds down after an agreement with unions; however, the strikes did cost the company almost 2.3 million barrels of oil in production. The strikes were in protest against the company’s divestment plans as it seeks to get rid of $15 billion in assets by the end of next year.

• We’re not going to spend too much time on the Syrian conflict this week, but we will note that there are few correct media perceptions about the Turkish downing…




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