• 6 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 8 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 hour U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 2 days US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 1 day EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 4 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 2 hours Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 2 days The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 8 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 2 days Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 2 days 47 Oil & Gas Projects Expected to Start in SE Asia between 2018 & 2025
  • 2 days A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 2 days OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 20 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
Alt Text

The Implications Of A Fractured U.S., Saudi Alliance

With tensions between the United…

Alt Text

A New Era Of Geopolitical Risk In Global Oil Markets

The geopolitical landscape in oil…

Editorial Dept

Editorial Dept

More Info

Trending Discussions

Global Energy Advisory – 17th April 2015

The Geopolitics of Oil

The Iran-Pakistan Pipeline

The Iran-Pakistan pipeline, which has been languishing on the Pakistani side, looks set to get a boost from China, which has apparently agreed to take on the $2 billion Pakistani pipeline segment. If this deal goes through, the Pakistani segment of the pipeline, which is 485 miles, would be funded largely by a Chinese loan and construction would be undertaken by China’s CNPC. Iran has already completed its 560-mile segment of the pipeline. Pakistanis say the deal with China is expected to be signed during a presidential visit to Islamabad this month. That this pipeline is now going ahead, after many delays, speaks volumes about Pakistan’s stance in the latest geopolitical quagmire in the Middle East.

About this time last year, the Saudis “donated” $1.5 billion to Pakistan. The US had long been trying to thwart the Iran-Pakistan pipeline—a $7.5-billion gas pipeline that would feed Iranian gas to desperate Pakistan, which suffers from severe energy shortages and whose economy is crippled at best. This pipeline is of immense importance to Pakistan and to the country’s overall stability. The US was not successful in convincing or blackmailing Pakistan into foregoing the project, and this is where Saudi money came into play. The US needed Pakistan’s help on the Afghan border. The $1.5 billion was a bribe. Right after the “donation” was issued in March 2014,…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News