• 4 minutes Oil Price Could Fall To $30 If Global Deal Not Extended
  • 7 minutes Middle East on brink: Oil tankers attacked off Oman
  • 11 minutes CNN:America's oil boom will break more records this year. OPEC is stuck in retreat
  • 14 minutes The Latest: Iranian FM Says US Cannot Expect To ‘Stay Safe’
  • 29 mins The Pope: "Climate change ... doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain."
  • 7 hours Coal Boom in Asia is Real and a Long Trend
  • 3 hours The Plastics Problem
  • 14 hours Hydrogen FTW... Some Day
  • 1 hour Solar Panels at 26 cents per watt
  • 1 day China's President Xi To Visit North Korea This Week
  • 1 day OPEC, GEO-POLITICS & OIL SUPPLY & PRICES
  • 17 hours GM Considering Electric Hummer
  • 4 hours The Magic and Wonders of US Shale Supply: Keeping energy price shock minimised: US oil supply keeping lid on prices despite global risks: IEA chief
  • 13 hours As Iran Nuclear Deal Flounders, France Turns To Saudi For Oil
  • 4 hours Why Is America (Texas) Burning Millions of Dollars Per Day Of Natural Gas?
  • 1 day Forbes: Giant Floating Solar Farms Could Extract CO2 From Seawater, Producing Methanol Fuel.
  • 1 day Fareed Zakaria: Canary in the Coal Mine (U.S. Dollar Hegemony)
  • 1 day Hormuz and surrounding waters: Energy Threats to the World: Oil, LNG, shipping markets digest new risks after Strait of Hormuz attack

Breaking News:

Oil Stabilizes On Small Crude Draw

Alt Text

Have Canadian Oil Prices Hit The Sweet Spot?

Canadian oil prices have recovered…

Alt Text

Oil Just Had Its Worst Run Since 2008

Oil prices have entered bear…

Alt Text

Oil Set For Worst Monthly Drop Since November

Oil prices continued to slide…

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

More Info

Trending Discussions

OPEC’s Three Options To Boost Oil Prices

After the initial short-lived enthusiasm over OPEC’s production cuts, the market started ignoring attempts by the cartel to talk up oil prices as it became evident that the glut would not clear as fast as expected. The extension of the output deal failed to lift the price of oil – in fact, prices plunged, with the market disappointed with the lack of deeper cuts.

OPEC’s policies to try to ‘fix’ the oil market and drive prices up have lost their previous relevance. In today’s market, OPEC is faced with rising output from short-cycle producers like U.S. shale, increasing production from other non-OPEC producers not part of the current deal, and dissent and increased output from within the cartel itself.

Looking at game theory, OPEC has three potential strategies to try to better manage the supply side of the oil market, and regain some of its lost relevance as a market force, Bloomberg View columnist Mohamed A. El-Erian suggests. Those different game-theory approaches involve either broader cooperation with other producers, or a more institutionalized plan for supervision of the cuts and incentives for cash-strapped members to prevent cheating.

Option 1 would be to try to muster a broader coalition to talk about supply issues, including U.S. shale, El-Erian says.

Considering how much U.S. drillers believe in the free market driving oil prices, and their general aversion to government and supra-governmental organizations ‘fixing’ production, this is the least likely strategy that could be implemented.

Strategy 2 would involve OPEC boosting cooperation with the non-OPEC producers that have joined the production cut agreement, and trying to plead for deeper cuts there. This approach could also seek to add stronger mechanisms to hold producers responsible for implementing their cuts, compared to the current ‘voluntary participation’. It could include a “stabilization fund”—as El-Erian put it—to help cash-strapped producers and incentivize them to continue sticking to the cuts.

Considering that within OPEC itself, compliance is waning, with producers pumping more to generate revenues from volumes rather than waiting for prices to rise, making the group led by Russia increasingly unlikely to cut further. Related: Goldman Sachs Vies For Role In Aramco IPO

A joint OPEC/non-OPEC technical committee will be meeting in Abu Dhabi early next week to discuss ways to improve compliance by members that have not been sticking 100 percent to their output quotas so far.

Seven months into the deal, the first OPEC member publicly admitted it wanted out—Ecuador broke ranks last month and announced that it would no longer stick to cuts because it needed to boost its oil revenue.

Finally, strategy 3 for OPEC —according to El-Erian—is the good old ‘drown the market in oil and kill U.S. shale’.

Although the policy to flood the market with (even more) oil, pushing prices so low that U.S. drillers are driven out of profitability, would stop the shale resurgence, OPEC would be shooting itself in the foot with this. Because, even though heavyweights Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Iran still boast the lowest breakeven prices to churn out profits from new developments, their fiscal break-even prices—the price of oil per barrel needed to balance their budgets—are much higher. According to a Goldman Sachs report from last month, quoted by Bloomberg, OPEC on average would need oil prices at US$70 to balance budgets this year, which is higher than the US$40-US$60 per barrel oil price that the world’s biggest listed companies need to pay for capex and dividends.

At low oil prices, Middle Eastern economies may have to resort to additional austerity measures like cutting subsidies and lavish perks for public servants. And with oil prices too low, the valuation of Saudi Aramco in next year’s planned IPO may not be even close to what analysts expect now.

OPEC is currently in a tight corner, but its game-theory options are all so difficult to implement that the cartel may be facing ever-diminishing market relevance and price-setting power.  

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Kr55 on August 04 2017 said:
    Production cuts would have worked just fine if they actually cut exports too. The Saudi's seemed to think people would care that Saudi crude stocks were drawing. Of course no one did. If OPEC actually cut exports by 1.5M/day from the start of 2017, the cuts would have worked just fine. Shale has only gone up ~200-300k since the start of the year.

    The option still exists to actually cut exports, and it seems like the Saudi's are actually going to try it now. Or so they say.
  • alfa on August 04 2017 said:
    Option 4: Buy out the shale producers and control its output.
  • Citizen oil on August 05 2017 said:
    KR55 is right. Do they actually think they can fool this market ? Everybody and his grandmother is analyzing this commodity with a fine tooth comb . It's the worst sentiment ever and they think exporting the same amount or more won't be noticed ? Greed ultimately always gets punished.

Leave a comment





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News