• 4 mintues Texas forced to have rolling brown outs. Not from downed power line , but because the wind energy turbines are frozen.
  • 7 minutes Forecasts for oil stocks.
  • 9 minutes Biden's $2 trillion Plan for Insfrastructure and Jobs
  • 13 minutes European gas market to 2040 according to Platts Analitics
  • 14 hours Fukushima
  • 2 days America's pandemic dead deserve accountability after Birx disclosure
  • 19 hours Today Biden calls for Summit with Putin. Will Joe apologize to Putin for calling him a "Killer" ?
  • 8 mins U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes
  • 2 days CO2 Mitigation on Earth and Magnesium Civilization on Mars – Just Add Water
  • 55 mins Simple question: What is the expected impact in electricity Demand when EV deployment exceeds 10%
  • 12 hours Biden about to face first real test. Russia building up military on Ukraine border.
  • 15 hours Joe Biden's Presidency
  • 1 day New Chinese Coal Plants Equal All those in U.S.A
  • 4 days Does .001 of Atmosphere Control Earth's Climate?!
  • 3 days Oh the Dems!!! They cheer for helping people while stabbing them in the back!!! Enbridge asks Canadian government to support oil pipeline in dispute with Michigan
  • 4 days The coming Cyber Attack
U.S. LNG Exports To Asia Hit Record Highs

U.S. LNG Exports To Asia Hit Record Highs

Since the fall of 2020,…

Europe Looks To Stock Up On Natural Gas This Summer

Europe Looks To Stock Up On Natural Gas This Summer

Europe’s natural gas inventories have…

Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

More Info

Premium Content

Renewable Natural Gas Close To Taking Off In U.S.

Renewable natural gas—methane collected from waste and manure—is a popular source of energy in Europe, but in the United States, it has yet to establish itself as a viable alternative to fossil fuel gas. Thanks to tax incentives and improving technologies, however, companies are making increasingly wider inroads into this segment of the renewable energy industry.

Earlier this month, New York became the latest city to join a growing network of 530 fueling stations featuring renewable natural gas (RNG) that are run by a T. Boone Pickens company, Clean Energy Fuels.

Meanwhile, construction is about to begin on an anaerobic digester—a facility that turns the methane from manure and other waste into higher-grade natural gas—at the Goodrich Family Farm in Vermont. The project was first announced in 2017. Waste from the farm will be processed at the digester and the gas will then be sent via a pipeline to Middlebury College where it will be fed into the college’s power plant.

Energy journalist Jonathan Mingle writes in a story for Yale Environment 360 that the developer and operator of the project, Vanguard Renewables, the Goodrich Family Farm digester is a strategic bet on RNG after building a network of five biogas facilities in Massachusetts.

“Producing RNG for pipeline injection and vehicle fueling is the evolution of where everything is going,” Mingle quotes Vanguard Renewables’ CEO as saying.

Indeed, the RNG business is gaining traction. It’s really a win-win situation for everyone involved: capturing methane for processing it into renewable natural gas reduces the amount of waste that goes into landfills and it also reduces methane emissions that are, according to some, even more harmful to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide.

A recent study from the University of Michigan found that the methane emissions from just six East Coast cities were a lot higher than previously thought and estimated by the EPA. According to the study, the combined methane emissions of New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston, Providence, and Baltimore exceeded the emissions of methane at places like the Four Corners region and the Bakken shale play. Related: This Arms Deal Could Trigger A New ‘’Cold War’’

Emissions-wise, this is bad news. In the context of tapping the potential of renewable natural gas, it’s actually good news because it adds to an already substantial potential.

Data from the EPA from 2014 says the United States produces enough methane to feed a minimum of 13,000 biogas plants and produce enough gas to supply power to as many as 3 million households. Another set of data, from the World Resources Institute, suggested the U.S. is sending to landfill and incinerators the equivalent of 6 billion gallons of diesel, which represents 15 percent of all the diesel fuel used by trucks and buses in the country.

It seems that albeit late, the U.S. is beginning to wake up to the potential of biogas. It can be produced from every sort of waste and leave as by-product fertilizer. Europe is already home to two-thirds of the global biogas power generation capacity, which stands at 15 GW. The United States has the feedstock to match and even exceed this. It’s only a question of time and the proper incentives.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment
  • Lee James on July 27 2019 said:
    This is a good news article: utilizing otherwise wasted methane and making fertilizer as a byproduct. We have a couple of successful dairy waste projects in our area.
  • only mho on July 29 2019 said:
    waste to energy (WTE) incineration seems to be a better solution then going straight to landfill waiting to collect a portion of the methane over time - the incinerators provide base load electricity and reduce the volume of waste to the landfill to just 10% of the starting volume while eliminating a methane pollution
  • GREGORY FOREMAN on July 29 2019 said:
    The City of Chicago employed such a system of Imhoff tanks producing methane, using the methane to power Chicago until the 1950s. The system was abandoned in favor of natural gas. Natural gas was less expensive, "easily" adaptable to the distribution system in existence and was less expensive to maintain than the Imhoff system.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News