• 4 minutes Who Really Benefits From The "Iran Attacked Saudi Arabia" Narrative?
  • 7 minutes Trump Will Win In 2020
  • 12 minutes Ethanol, the Perfect Home Remedy for A Saudi Oil Fever
  • 15 minutes Experts review Saudi damage photos. Say Said is need to do a lot of explaining.
  • 31 mins Millennials: A boil on the butt of the work ethic
  • 9 hours Hong Kong protesters appeal to Trump for support.
  • 7 hours A little something for all you Offshore swabbies
  • 19 hours Europe: The Cracks Are Beginning To Show
  • 16 hours Ban Fracking? What in the World Are Democrats Thinking?
  • 21 hours Iran Vows Major War Even If US Conducts "Limited Strikes"
  • 3 hours When Trying To Be Objective About Ethanol, Don't Include Big Oil Lies To Balance The Argument
  • 3 hours LA Times: Vote Trump out in 2020 to Prevent Climate Apocalypse
  • 30 mins US and China are already in a full economic war and this battle for global hegemony is a little bit frightening
  • 6 hours Saudi State-of-Art Defense System looking the wrong way. MBS must fire Defense Minister. Oh, MBS is Defense Minister. Forget about it.
  • 6 hours Shale profitability
  • 6 hours Memorize date 05/15/2018 cause Huawei ban is the most important single event in world history after 9/11/2001.
  • 3 hours Pompeo: Aramco Attacks Are An "Act Of War" By Iran
  • 16 hours Let's shut down dissent like The Conversation in Australia
Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

More Info

Premium Content

The Oil Rally Is Helping Renewables

It may sound counterintuitive, but higher crude oil prices have proved to be a boon for the renewable energy industry, at least when it comes to adoption of clean energy solutions and products—notably electric cars. This year, thanks to the oil price rally, EVs, solar and wind power will continue to grow, according to the latest outlook from Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Falling costs of lithium-ion batteries will be the driver behind greater EV adoption, BNEF’s chief editor Angus McCrone notes in the report. Costs will be falling for wind and solar installations, too, thanks to tech advancements and to the successful application of economies of scale.

But lower costs for batteries are not the only thing spurring on EVs, of course. The oil price rally is making EVs more competitive against vehicles running on internal combustion engines. This makes sense, and one might speculate that the effect will be particularly marked this year, as gasoline prices jumped rather quickly, and drivers are averse to this kind of price shock.

But we might just as easily speculate that most EVs are not yet truly competitive with ICE cars on things like range, recharging infrastructure, and other performance metrics that drivers care about. EV adoption will probably increase this year, but it’s still too early for them to become mainstream. Related: What's Behind Canada's Oil Driller Exodus?

In an earlier update, BNEF analysts estimated that battery costs had fallen by as much as 24 percent last year—an impressive figure indeed. They also predicted that EVs would advance enough on the cost front to start undercutting ICE vehicles by the mid to late 2020s. This target is evidence that the EV revolution will undoubtedly be a slow one.

It could be slowed down additionally by higher raw material prices for batteries. Prices for cobalt, lithium, even little-known vanadium, which is also used in lithium-ion batteries, have been soaring and they will continue to soar as market players worry about imminent shortages.

Moving on to wind and solar: BNEF’s analysts believe these industries will face some strong headwinds in the cost department. Wind and solar installations are capex-intensive projects, the analysts note, and the Fed’s planned rate hikes this year could have an adverse effect on them. Related: The Biggest Threat To U.S. Oil Exports

A 30-percent tariff on Chinese PV modules is also believed by some to be a threat to the solar industry, but there is certainly no consensus in this respect. In fact, some experts argue that the effects of the tariff on the U.S. solar industry will, in the long run, be negligible. In the short term, however, lack of access to cheap Chinese modules will likely drive up costs, offsetting the effects of technological improvements either partially or wholly.

Yet the extent of cost reduction in wind and solar cannot be underestimated. According to BNEF, this year total investment in these globally will remain generally flat on 2017, at $333.5 billion. But there will be more new capacity installed thanks to these lower costs. Over 100GW of new solar capacity will come on stream this year, along with 59GW of new wind capacity. Whether this will be enough to bring the world closer to hitting the Paris Agreement targets of slowing down the rate of global warming to 2°C remains an open question; last year there were warnings that investment in renewables needs to jump considerably if the target is to be met.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage



Leave a comment
  • John Brown on February 01 2018 said:
    As I read this article and look at the move of WTI over $65 to near $66 I'm just in awe. The world still has an oil glut. Despite OPEC/Russia idling millions of BPD to balance the market there is still a glut. Smaller than before but still a glut with all that capacity sitting their on the sidelines. Then a major article yesterday was that the USA shale oil industry has surpassed $10Million barrels a day. U.S. production is the highest in 50 years, and soaring with prices not only over $50, but today over $65. U.S. production is clearly going to outstrip all forecast while they are able to continue to lower production cost and enjoy a mountain of cash/profit with these prices. Then there is this article. The cost of renewables and electric cars is dropping fast, and higher prices have created an opening for them to continue to create market share, and once they are in place they are there to stay.
    So I have to congratulate the industry and all the support industries. There really is no reason oil should be above $40, and they've manipulated WTI over $65, and despite all this news prices are on the up side today. Well good for them, but it seems to me that every day they keep oil prices at this level is another day they put a nail in the coffin of high oil prices. I'm betting though based on what I've seen that they can manipulate the price at this level, and maybe even a litter higher for most of this year. That's good for the U.S. oil industry and everybody that's loaned it money, and its good for renewables gaining market share as their cost continue to fall. $60 to $70 plus oil is pretty much good news all the way around leading to record production and supply, and future lower demand.
  • kent beuchert on February 01 2018 said:
    Oil has nothing whatsoever to do with solar or wind power. We don't use oil anymore to make electricity

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play