• 4 minutes Is $60/Bbl WTI still considered a break even for Shale Oil
  • 7 minutes Oil Price Editorial: Beware Of Saudi Oil Tanker Sabotage Stories
  • 11 minutes Mueller Report Brings Into Focus Obama's Attempted Coup Against Trump
  • 15 minutes Wonders of Shale- Gas,bringing investments and jobs to the US
  • 10 hours Adsorbent natural gas tanks are revolutionary.
  • 53 mins Total nonsense in climate debate
  • 24 mins Visualizing How Much Oil Is In An Electric Vehicle (Hint: a heckuva lot)
  • 9 hours Apartheid Is Still There: Post-apartheid South Africa Is World’s Most Unequal Country
  • 10 hours Evil Awakens: Fascist Symbols And Rhetoric On Rise In Italian EU Vote
  • 13 hours IMO2020 To scrub or not to scrub
  • 6 hours Theresa May to Step Down
  • 1 day Look at the LONGER TERM bigger picture of international oil & gas. Ignore temporary hiccups.
  • 2 days Will Canada drop Liberals, vote in Conservatives?
  • 18 hours IMO 2020 could create fierce competition for scarce water resources
  • 2 hours Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe
  • 2 days Canada's Uncivil Oil War : 78% of Voters Cite *Energy* as the Top Issue
  • 2 days Trump needs to educate US companies and citizens on Chinese Communist Party and People's Liberation Army. This is real ECONOMIC WARFARE. To understand Chinese warfare read General Sun Tzu's "Art of War" . . . written 500 B.C.

Should You Try And Grab This Falling Knife?

rig

There is an old traders’ cliché that says that it is dangerous to attempt to catch a falling knife. Like most clichés there is an element of truth to that, but I can assure you that thousands of traders in thousands of dealing rooms around the world do that, or more accurately what looks like that, every day. They know that markets tend to overshoot and that there is good money to be made trading retracements, but they have rules for entry that increase their chances of finding the low and decrease their risk.

The most common of those is to wait until the knife, while it looks to be still falling, is actually bouncing around on the floor. That means waiting until whatever you are trading has shown signs of forming a bottom. With that in mind, take a look at the chart below for Petrobras (PBR).

(Click to enlarge)

I know it looks ugly at first glance but take a closer look at the last few candles. What you see there is a potential bottom forming, setting up the kind of trade I mentioned. The low of this move was reached on June 1st at $9.20, a level that was attempted again six days later, once again without breaking through. The low on that occasion was $9.22 and while that two cents may not seem important there are major implications to even a very slightly higher low on the second try at a level.

When traders see a major support forming it is often based on big commercial or fund orders at the level. Those that are working those orders cannot “front-run” them by buying for themselves just in front of the order level, but those that know they are there because they sold into them on the run down can, and in this case did, raising the low point by just a couple of cents. Of course, there are no guarantees to any trade, but as we approach $9.20 again after a bounce it certainly catches the eye. For those with a short-term outlook, just playing that technical read by buying at around $9.30 (the level as I write) with a stop just below the low, say around $9 and a target of a return to $10 would be a viable trade, but in this case, I prefer more of a swing-trade structure.

Obviously the PBR chart wouldn’t look like it does without some fundamental reason, and there are plenty of those. In fact, you could say that there are too many. The stock has come up against a perfect storm of bad news over the last few weeks. PBR is the Brazilian state oil company and many of its past problems…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News