• 7 minutes Get First Access To The Oilprice App!
  • 11 minutes Japanese Refiners Load First Iran Oil Cargo Since U.S. Sanctions
  • 13 minutes Oil prices forecast
  • 17 minutes Renewables in US Set for Fast Growth
  • 4 hours Socialists want to exorcise the O&G demon by 2030
  • 9 hours Chinese FDI in U.S. Drops 90%: America's Clueless Tech Entrepreneurs
  • 8 hours Oceans "Under Fire" Of Plastic Trash
  • 1 day Is Natural Gas Renewable? I say yes it is.
  • 4 hours Good Marriage And Bad Divorce: Germany's Merkel Wants Britain and EU To Divorce On Good Terms
  • 3 hours Cheermongering about O&G in 2019
  • 10 hours Duterte's New Madness: Philippine Senators Oppose President's Push To Lower Criminal Age To 9
  • 1 day Blame Oil Price or EVs for Car Market Crash? Auto Recession Has Started
  • 1 day Making Fun of EV Owners: ICE-ing Trend?
  • 18 hours North Sea Rocks Could Store Months Of Renewable Energy
  • 1 day Emissions from wear of brakes and tyres likely to be higher in supposedly clean vehicles, experts warn
  • 45 mins *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 1 day Orphan Wells
James Stafford

James Stafford

James Stafford is the Editor of Oilprice.com

More Info

Recycling: The Future of Fracking

The “hydraulic” part of the fracking equation means buying a lot of water and then paying to get rid of it once it’s been tainted. So figuring out how to help companies recycle frack water is an emerging business opportunity that could be worth countless billions. But we’re not there quite yet—it still costs more to use recycled frack water in shale plays where water is plentiful and disposal wells numerous. Right now if you look at plays where there aren’t enough disposal wells, frack water recycling is becoming the norm. At the same time, the price gap is closing, gradually, for recycling in arid areas where water is harder to come by.  We’re eyeing the companies who are poised to take advantage of what will certainly be the future of fracking

But before we take you through the companies who are hedging their bets on the profits to be made on recycling frack water, let’s take a look at the costs and the latest technological advancements.  

The background to this story takes us back to the Barnett shale in Texas, where the shale boom really started off. At that time, water was fairly affordable and operators could pretty easily get rid of the chemical-laden frack water in disposal wells. So obtaining and getting rid of frack water hasn’t been a huge problem—but it is an expensive one.

Recycling frack water is still a relatively new idea—more so, recycling frack water for use as…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin



Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News